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Global Blue Growth Initiative and Small Island Developing States (SIDS)








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    Achieving Blue Growth. Building vibrant fisheries and aquaculture communities
    Building vibrant fisheries and aquaculture communities
    2018
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    Fisheries and aquaculture support the livelihoods of millions of people around the world. In rural and coastal communities they often play a key role for a society’s culture and identity. As these communities know well, fish is also a healthy and nutritious food, with the potential to feed our growing planet. But as the population grows, the demand for fish increases, and our natural resources are increasingly stressed. Sustainable management and development is crucial to preserving these resources for future generations. Like the Green Economy principles that preceded it, FAO’s Blue Growth Initiative emphasizes the three pillars of sustainable development – social, economic, and environmental– so that fisheries and aquaculture contribute to the 2030 Agenda Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Blue Growth Initiative is a strategic approach to improving the use of aquatic resources resulting in better social, economic and environmental outcomes.
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    LADA Local Land Degradation Assessment Adapted for Small Island Developing States 2017
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    Sustainable management of the natural resource base is a fundamental issue to support global environmental benefits provided by ecosystem services, and to ensure agricultural production and ultimately food security and livelihoods. Assessing land degradation is a major component of effective sustainable land management particularly in Small Island Developing States (SIDS). SIDS are generally characterized by high levels of chronic poverty, largely rural based populations and dependence on tradit ional agriculture. At the same time, SIDS possess unique characteristics, that further exacerbates the problems associated with land degradation, given the small size of the countries and their economies, limited infrastructure, distance from large international markets, high vulnerability to natural disasters, low level of human resource development, and increasing urbanization. Small size, combined with, diverse soil types, topography, climatic variation, lack or in some cases archaic and poor land use policies limits the area available for urban settlement, agriculture, mining, commercial forestry, tourism and other infrastructure, and creates intense competition between land use options. This manual adapts the assessment methodologies which were developed under the LADA project to the particular situation of SIDS. It is built on country experiences and is expected to enhance the capacity of the user to conduct more integrated and participatory assessments of land degradation, and t o monitor impacts of interventions or changes in land management more effectively. The manual reflects a substantial shift in attention from the conventional focus on assessing degradation, to a balanced assessment that looks at both the negative and positive effects and trends of land use/ management on the natural resources and ecosystem services.
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    Report of the Subregional Workshop to Promote Sustainable Aquaculture Development in the Small Island Developing States of the Lesser Antilles. Vieux Fort, Saint Lucia, 4-7 November 2002. 2003
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    The workshop was organized by the FAO Subregional Office for the Caribbean in collaboration with the Development Planning and Inland Water Resources and Aquaculture Services of the FAO Fisheries Department, Rome. It was hosted by the Government of Saint Lucia, and attended by 15 participants from seven countries, four regional institutions and the FAO Fisheries Department. The syntheses of the national experiences and status of aquaculture development in the Lesser Antilles reflected a signifi cant level of diversity in the scale of activities among the island nations; they also revealed many similarities in the results and present status of aquaculture development in the subregion. The case studies elicited very positive comments and enquiries from the country representatives. In the plenary deliberations, to identify the constraints to and opportunities for developing aquaculture sustainably in the subregion, participants recognized the need to rank the aquaculture development act ivities based on individual country-priorities and stage of development. The workshop agreed that participants would consult with the decision-makers in their respective countries and communicate a priority-list of needs for possible technical assistance to the technical secretary of the workshop. It was also agreed that such a list would be used to identify common themes that could form the basis for a possible subregional Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) project proposal.

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