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Biodiversity Conservation and Use in China’s Dongting Lake - GCP/CPR/043/GFF








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    Newsletter
    Dongting Lake Newsletter, May2020 - Issue #4 2020
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    As the second largest freshwater lake in China, Dongting Lake has been identified as an important global ecological area, including two National Nature Reserves in the East and West Dongting, and two Provincial Nature Reserves in the South Dongting and Hengling lakes, with a total area of 31,200 hectares. It bears the important function of regulating and storing the water of Yangtze River and the four rivers of Hunan Province, which are Xiang River, Zi River, Ruan River, and Li River. Therefore, it plays an irreplaceable role in maintaining the safety of people along those rivers and ensuring the ecological security in the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River. Dongting Lake has received intensive attention in recent years. It is listed as the key target in "Green Sword Operation", "Green Shield Operation", and other environmental protection projects at national or provincial level. As an important part of the information management of Dongting Lake, the integrated Information Monitoring System can monitor a variety of natural resources of Dongting Lake in real time, which helps to understand the ecosystem of Dongting Lake in the macro sense, but also dynamically monitor changes in the area and quantity of ecological problems under the influence of human activities, providing detailed information and scientific data for protecting species and ecological environment of the area and making management decisions.
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    Book (series)
    Mid-term evaluation of “Securing Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Use in China's Dongting Lake Protected Areas”
    GCP/CPR/043/GFF
    2019
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    The Dongting Wetlands is China’s second-largest freshwater lake and one of the 200 key global ecozones. Its high biodiversity serves as an important ecosystem for over 120 bird species and many endangered species. It plays an important socioeconomic role in the area as nearly 16 million people live around the lake. Despite the importance of the wetlands, the services it provides are increasingly at risk. Loss of habitat arising from sector conflicts and economic interests of local farmers and fishers has resulted in a decline in wildlife populations and in some cases entire species. FAO intervened to secure the conservation of biodiversity in the area through strengthening existing management efforts and promoting long-term sustainable development. Activities such as hunting, fishing, planting and reclamation have been stopped and most policy level outcome targets for biodiversity have been reached. The mid-term evaluation makes recommendations for the second half of the project, with a particular focus on knowledge management. It recommends a systematic approach to sharing good practices and technical support with learning facilities across the various project sites. GCP/CPR/043/GFF GEF ID: 4356
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    Newsletter
    Newsletter of Securing Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Use in China's dongting lake protected areas
    Project Newsletter
    2018
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    The “securing biodiversity conservation and sustainable use in china's dongting lake protected areas” project is a joint effort by the forestry department of hunan province (FDHP), the four nature reserves (NR) management bureaus, other provincial and local partners, the food & agriculture organization of the united nations (FAO) and the global environmental facility (GEF). The objective is to secure the conservation of biodiversity of global importance in dongting lake ecosystem by strengthening existing management efforts and the promotion of wetland’s long-term sustainable development.

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