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Scientists and farmers team-up to seek diversity in Morocco’s fields

On-farm conservation and mining of local durum and bread wheat landraces of Morocco for biotic stresses and incorporating UG99 resistance








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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    The first cycle of Treaty Benefit-sharing Fund Projects Teams farmers with scientists and fields with labs
    Introduction
    2009
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    Visit the ITPGRFA internet sitet . More than 350 groups with ideas about ways to conserve the world’s crop genetic diversity applied for the first cycle of grants made by the Benefit-sharing Fund, with winners announced 31 May 2009 at the Third Session of the Treaty Governing Body (GB3) in Tunis.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Farmers choose best-adapted varieties for testing
    Conservation of agrobiodiversity of local cultivars of millet, maize and sorgum through improved participatory methods
    2009
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    Visit ITPGRFA site internet. In Senegal, 90 percent of the farming area is dedicated to cereal production. Yet three of the main crops, millet, maize and sorghum, are facing progressive loss of genetic diversity in the fields and low variability which has dire effects on the abilities of farmers to achieve good results in their harvesting seasons. Thus, the Treaty Benefit-sharing Fund Project in Senegal pulled 340 samples of millet, maize and s orghum from a database to discuss their merits with local farmers. They specifically chose samples that still are found in farmers’ fields, not those that only exist in genebanks. This allowed local farmers to offer practical advice as to which ones would be best to include in on-farm testing that would determine which ones were best adapted to climatic conditions and also which ones met the taste demands of consumers. The farmers chose 55 varieties.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Rebuilding farmers’ safety nets through on-farm conservation
    Strengthening on-farm conservation and use of sorghum, finger millet, lablab beans and yam crop diversities for improved food security and adaptation to climate changes in Tanzania
    2009
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    Visit ITPGRFA site internet. Tanzania’s fields are losing their safety nets of plant genetic diversity, due to ongoing environmental challenges, changing farming systems, and even changes in taste preferences. In Tanzania, more than 80 percent of the population depends on agriculture for their livelihoods. In many parts of the country, this means subsistence agriculture practiced by smallholders who have traditionally mitigated the risks of ext reme weather events, pests and market fluctuations by relying on the diversity of their locally adapted traditional crops. Biodiversity constituted a kind of insurance. However, as they adopted improved crop varieties in recent decades, they abandoned their local seeds.

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