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Emergency Response to the Fall Armyworm Outbreak - TCP/GHA/3606









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    Project
    Emergency Assistance to Contain the Spread of Fall Armyworm Outbreak - TCP/ETH/3604 2020
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    Fall Armyworm (FAW) outbreaks in one locality in thesouthwestern part of Ethiopia in early planted maizecaused serious damage to maize. By the end ofJune 2017, FAW infestation was reported in 374 woredasin six regions, namely Amhara, Benishangul-Gumz,Gambella, Oromia, SNNPR and Tigray regional states.In these woredas, maize was planted on more than1.7 million hectares (ha), of which more than 378 000 hawere already infested by FAW, which was expectedto increase at a fast rate, covering the entire projected2.3 million ha of maize, with the same magnitude ofimpact on sorghum. FAW was new to the country andconcerted efforts were required to reduce the impact onmaize production, which could have far-reachingconsequences on food and nutrition security. In responseto this critical situation, the Government of Ethiopiarequested that FAO provide emergency assistance andtechnical support/advice on the management and controlof this newly introduced maize insect pest. The overallobjective of the project was to strengthen FAWmonitoring and management capacities at all levels, tosignificantly reduce the infestation, spread and impacton maize, and possibly other cereal crops.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Technical guidance on fall armyworm
    Coordinated surveillance and an early warning system for the sustainable management of transboundary pests, with special reference to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda [J.E. Smith]) in South and Southeast Asia
    2022
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    Worldwide, maize is the third most important cereal after rice and wheat. It occupies 197 million hectares of planted area. Asia contributes to nearly 30 percent of global maize supplies, and area and production of the crop is rapidly increasing in the continent. Minimum support prices, swelling market demand from the animal feed and processing industries, as well as human consumption, have all led to increased maize production in zones where precipitation limits rice cultivation. However, maize production is currently threatened by the arrival in Asia (in 2018) of the fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) – a native to North America. It invaded India in 2018 and since then it has marched to most of the Asian countries. In 2019, its presence was confirmed in 13 Asian countries including Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, and Viet Nam. In 2020, it was confirmed in Australia, Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea. In August 2021, it reached the Solomon Islands, posing a serious threat to other Pacific islands. FAW is a fast-dispersing, migratory, transboundary insect pest. While high FAW incidences have been reported on several crops in Asia, the most important economic damage caused is to maize (followed by sorghum). The FAW invasion threatens the food security of millions of family farms in Asia, with smallholder farmers being especially vulnerable. The negative economic impact of FAW is not only evident in yield loss: the pest also leads to a significant increase in insecticide applications, with associated health, environmental and cost issues. At the same time, resilience to FAW on the continent is currently weakened by the limited access to necessary tools, technologies and sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) practices for FAW. Thus, there is an urgent need to implement an effective approach to FAW management in Asia.
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    Booklet
    Burkina Faso: Impact of fall armyworm on maize production, livelihoods and food security
    DIEM-Impact report, July 2023
    2023
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    Since its appearance in 2016, fall armyworm has spread to many countries and remains one of the main threats to agriculture and food security in Africa. Among the countries affected by fall armyworm in West Africa and the Sahel, Burkina Faso was selected for this assessment based on the production level of maize, level of fall armyworm infestation and associated recorded or estimated crop losses, presence of other shocks and level of food insecurity. In addition, the Cadre Harmonisé analysis indicated that 12 percent of the population was in Phase 3+ over the second half of 2022, the highest in West Africa. This impact assessment follows a methodology developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations' (FAO's) Data in Emergencies Information System (DIEM), articulated in three steps: a household survey, a scouting exercise to measure the level of fall armyworm infestation, and a crop cutting experiment conducted at harvest time to determine the yields. The objective was to assess the impact of fall armyworm on maize production, and the livelihoods and food security of maize farmers in Burkina Faso. FAO established DIEM-Impact to provide a granular and rapid understanding of the impact of large-scale hazards on agriculture and agricultural livelihoods using a variety of assessment methodologies, including primary and secondary information, remote sensing technologies, and FAO’s damage and loss methodology. DIEM-Impact presents a regularly updated and accessible assessment of the state of food insecurity in fragile environments and helps underpin FAO's programming based on evidence.

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