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Evaluation of FAO’s role and work on antimicrobial resistance (AMR)











Annex 1. Terms of reference

Annex 2. Results of the FAO Members and country level surveys

Annex 3. Contribution by the AMR expert panel

Management response

Follow-up report


FAO. 2021. Evaluation of FAO’s role and work on antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Thematic Evaluation Series, 03/2021. Rome.



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