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Joint FAO-WFP Evaluation of the Food Security Cluster Coordination - Executive Summary











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    Meeting
    Joint FAO-WFP Evaluation of the Food Security Cluster Coordination
    Management Response
    2014
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    Document
    FAO/WFP Joint Evaluation of Food Security Cluster Coordination in Humanitarian Action
    Evaluation Report
    2014
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    The Emergency Relief Coordinator and the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) introduced the cluster system in 2005 as part of a wider reform of the humanitarian system. In 2010, the global food security cluster (FSC), co-led by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and WFP, was created to coordinate food security interventions in emergencies. The global FSC has 47 members and a Global Support Team (GST), based in Rome with an average of 12 staff members and a cum ulative budget of USD 7 million for January 2011 to January 2014.1 Global humanitarian funding for food and agriculture over the same period was about USD 12.5 billion.2 The GST facilitates coordination at the global level and supports both formal food security clusters and other food security coordination systems in more than 40 countries. Structures and resources for coordination vary widely, ranging from situations in which there are no dedicated resources for coordination, to those with coor dination and information management teams at the country and hub levels, with direct costs of up to USD 1 million per year. The global FSC supports country-level coordination mechanisms through surge and support missions, tools, guidance, training and information management. Food security coordination mechanisms at the country and local levels can support all stages of a humanitarian response, including preparedness, needs assessment and analysis, strategy formulation, implementation, reporting and learning. This coordination is expected to improve the capacity of humanitarian organizations to respond strategically and coherently, and to reduce gaps and duplications. Ultimately, it is expected to result in improved services to the populations affected by crises and emergencies.

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