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The state of food insecurity in the world 2001











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    The state of food insecurity in the world 2000 2000
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    The state of food insecurity in the world (SOFI) was created to track progress towards ending this profound obstacle to human rights, quality of life and dignity. It was spurred by the 1996 World Food Summit in Rome, where leaders of 186 countries pledged to reduce by half the number of hungry people in the world by 2015. In this second edition we introduce a new tool for measuring the severity of want: the depth of hunger. This is a measure of the per person food deficit of the undernour ished population within each country. Measured in kilocalories, it aims to assess just how empty people's plates are each day. Most of the countries with the most extreme depth of hunger (more than 300 kilocalories per person per day) are located in Africa; others are found in the Near East (Afghanistan), the Caribbean (Haiti) and Asia (Bangladesh, Democratic People's Republic of Korea and Mongolia). Many of these countries face extraordinary obstacles such as conflict or recurrent natural disa sters. They require special attention to lift them out of their current state of deep poverty and dire food insecurity. SOFI 2000 also updates the estimate of the number of undernourished people.
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    The State of Food Insecurity in the World 1999
    Food insecurity: when people must live with hunger and fear starvation
    1999
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    In the developing world, 790 million people do not have enough to eat, according to the most recent estimates (1995/97). That represents a decline of 40 million compared to 1990/92. At the World Food Summit in 1996, world leaders pledged to reduce the number of hungry people to around 400 million by 2015. At the current rate of progress, a reduction of 8 million undernourished people a year, there is no hope of meeting that goal. According to The State of Food Insecurity in the W orld 1999, the current reduction does not indicate uniform progress throughout the world. Indeed the data reveal that, in the first half of this decade, just 37 countries achieved a reduction in the number of undernourished, totalling 100 million people. Across the rest of the developing world, the number of hungry people actually increased by almost 60 million. This first edition of The State of Food Insecurity in the World also points out that hunger is not limited to the devel oping nations. It presents the first assessment of the number of undernourished people in the developed world, finding 8 million in the industrialized countries and 26 million in the countries in transition.
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    The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2006
    Eradicating world hunger – taking stock ten years after the World Food Summit
    2006
    Ten years ago, world leaders met in Rome for the World Food Summit (WFS) to discuss ways to end hunger. They pledged their commitment to an ongoing effort to eradicate hunger in all countries and set themselves the immediate target of halving the number of undernourished people by 2015. To this purpose, they approved the World Food Summit Plan of Action. In October 2006, FAO’s Committee on World Food Security is undertaking an assessment of the implementation of the Plan of Action and a mid-term review of progress towards achieving the target. The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2006 reviews progress and setbacks in hunger reduction since 1990–92, the established baseline period. The first section of the report, Undernourishment around the world, reviews trends in hunger at the global, regional and subregional levels. It also presents FAO’s most recent projections of undernourishment in 2015. The second section, Undernourishment in the regions, reviews the food security situation in each of the major developing regions and the transition countries. The third section, Towards the Summit commitments, summarizes lessons from past experience in hunger reduction and presents FAO’s current thinking on how to accelerate progress towards meeting the WFS target. Two tables (pp. 32–38) provide detailed information on levels of undernourishment in developing and transition countries and other indicators relevant to food security. The report also includes maps (page 31) illustratin g the global food security situation and progress in hunger reduction.

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