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GIEWS Update – Palestine, 29 January 2024

Population of the Gaza Strip at risk of famine due to conflict











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    Monitoring food security in Palestine and the Sudan
    A joint FAO/WFP update for the members of the United Nations Security Council, February 2024. Issue No. 13 (Special edition)
    2024
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    This is the thirteenth update of the Monitoring food security in food crisis countries and territories with conflict situations, jointly produced by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Food Programme (WFP) to inform members of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) on critical food crises driven by conflict and insecurity. This Special edition focuses on Palestine (particularly the Gaza Strip) and the Sudan. In the Gaza Strip and the Sudan, conflict has pushed people to the highest levels of acute food insecurity. People in these contexts require the most urgent attention and support to avoid any risk of famine. The Gaza Strip and the Sudan are currently two out of five Hunger Hotspot countries of highest concern globally. This report explores some of the impacts of armed conflict on food security from the perspective of protecting civilians and objects indispensable for their survival that represent essential components of food systems, as well as the challenges of securing safe, timely and unimpeded humanitarian access, both of which are addressed by Resolution 2417. By exploring conflict-induced food insecurity in the Gaza Strip and the Sudan, this report seeks to contribute to the monitoring of the implementation of Resolution 2417 and provides recommendations that the UNSC may consider to prevent further deteriorations in food security. FAO and WFP have jointly produced this twice-yearly report for the members of the UNSC since June 2016.
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    Newsletter
    GIEWS Update - The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia
    Dire food insecurity situation in northern areas due to conflict
    2021
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    In northern Tigray Region and neighbouring Amhara and Afar regions, conflict has severely damaged rural livelihood systems and displaced about 3.2 million people. In Tigray Region, crop production of the main 2021 “Meher” harvest, currently underway, is estimated to be 58 percent below the already poor 2020 main harvest, resulting in the third consecutive season with reduced production since the start of hostilities in November 2020. About 15 percent of the heads of livestock in Tigray Region has been looted or slaughtered. In June 2021, about 4.4 million people in conflict-affected areas were projected to face severe food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 [Crisis] and above) between July and September, including 401 000 people in IPC Phase 5 (Catastrophe). The current prevalence and severity of food insecurity are likely to be higher as the projection could not be carried out for all areas affected by the conflict in June and due to the expansion of hostilities to most of Afar and Amhara regions since July. Unimpeded humanitarian access is urgently needed to support vulnerable households in conflict‑affected areas to avert the risk of famine.
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    Newsletter
    GIEWS Special Alert No. 350 - Somalia, 27 September 2022
    Unless humanitarian assistance is urgently scaled up, famine is expected in late 2022 due to unprecedented multi‑season drought
    2022
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    Famine is expected to occur in Bay Region between October and December 2022, if humanitarian assistance is not urgently scaled up. About 6.7 million people, over 40 percent of the total population, are projected to face severe acute food insecurity, including over 300 000 people in IPC Phase 5 (Catastrophe). The dire food insecurity situation is the consequence of a prolonged drought that began in late 2020, compounded by the protracted conflict and hikes in international prices of foodstuffs and fuel caused by the war in Ukraine. As meteorological forecasts point to below-average October–December 2022 “Deyr” rains, food security conditions are expected to deteriorate.

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