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Saving lives through early action

Food security and social cohesion in La Guajira, on the front line of the migration and extreme drought crisis










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Cuando actuar temprano salva vidas
    Seguridad alimentaria y cohesión social en La Guajira, primera línea de la crisis migratoria y de sequía extrema
    2020
    Also available in:

    FAO Colombia, en respuesta a la emergencia humanitaria que se estaba generando en el departamento de La Guajira, como consecuencia de la crisis migratoria y de la sequía extrema, desplegó un conjunto de acciones en cinco municipios, logrando un rápido e innegable impacto en la seguridad alimentaria y cohesión social de más de 7 000 hombres, mujeres y niños: por cada dólar invertido, las familias participantes lograron generar un beneficio de 2,6 dólares e incrementaron su capacidad de resiliencia. El proyecto de La Guajira se enmarca en el Sistema de Alerta y Acción Temprana de FAO (EWEA, por su sigla en inglés), y fue cofinanciado por la Agencia Sueca de Desarrollo Internacional (ASDI) a través del Fondo Especial para Actividades de Emergencia y Rehabilitación de la FAO (SFERA), por la cooperación brasilera y también por el Fondo Central para la Acción en Casos de Emergencia (CERF) de la ONU.
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    Booklet
    Madagascar: Impact of Early Warning Early Action
    Protecting farming livelihoods from drought and food insecurity
    2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    There is evidence that the intensity and frequency of natural hazards and conflicts are increasing. Natural disasters now occur nearly five times as often as 40 years ago. The impact on local economies, on people's livelihoods and on lives has similarly grown. In some of the worst-hit places, it can seem unrelenting. One crisis will follow another, every time stripping away at the hard-earned but limited assets of the poorest and most vulnerable, depriving people of their self-reliance and their dignity. Globally, expanding needs, competing priorities and limited resources mean that new tools are essential to make humanitarian interventions as wisely and effectively as possible, to ensure that the impacts of crises are limited before they can grow into even more costly disasters. Support at the right time protects and empowers people the most, giving them the confidence to keep going or to resume their livelihoods. Investing in early action means FAO can help shelter longer-term development gains and increase resilience. Working with national governments and humanitarian, development and scientific partners, FAO’s Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) approach monitors risk information systems and translates warnings into anticipatory actions. Every quarter, FAO’s Early Warning Early Action report on food security and agriculture ranks risks by their likelihood and potential impact and identifies the best interventions. Then, FAO’s Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA), can release money from its early action window. These funds back tailored plans which are put into place drawing on FAO’s greatest asset – its technical knowledge and expertise in supporting rural livelihoods. Early actions are varied and flexible, ranging from cash transfers for fishing communities to safely store their nets ahead of an impending cyclone, to livestock treatments for herders as a drought approaches, to flood defences before a severe rainy season to protect crops. This study analyses the outcomes of monitoring early warnings on drought and taking targeted early actions in the south of Madagascar between 2017 and 2018. It evaluates their effectiveness and quantifies the benefits of acting early.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    The Niger and Burkina Faso: Sida’s contribution to the Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA) – Anticipatory Action window 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Sahel region is experiencing a food crisis, with 38.3 million people projected to be in acute food insecurity during this year’s lean season (June–August 2022) – a fourfold increase compared with 2019 – and millions more at risk of slipping into a crisis situation or worse. The effects of climate change in the region are worsening irregular rainfall and climatic shocks such as floods. Both Burkina Faso and the Niger are especially vulnerable to flood risk. Thanks to the contribution of the Swedish International Development Agency (Sida) to the Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA) – Anticipatory Action window, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is acting early in flood-prone areas in the Sahel through cash assistance, capacity building and veterinary support to protect the assets and livelihoods of vulnerable pastoralists.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Cuando actuar temprano salva vidas
    Seguridad alimentaria y cohesión social en La Guajira, primera línea de la crisis migratoria y de sequía extrema
    2020
    Also available in:

    FAO Colombia, en respuesta a la emergencia humanitaria que se estaba generando en el departamento de La Guajira, como consecuencia de la crisis migratoria y de la sequía extrema, desplegó un conjunto de acciones en cinco municipios, logrando un rápido e innegable impacto en la seguridad alimentaria y cohesión social de más de 7 000 hombres, mujeres y niños: por cada dólar invertido, las familias participantes lograron generar un beneficio de 2,6 dólares e incrementaron su capacidad de resiliencia. El proyecto de La Guajira se enmarca en el Sistema de Alerta y Acción Temprana de FAO (EWEA, por su sigla en inglés), y fue cofinanciado por la Agencia Sueca de Desarrollo Internacional (ASDI) a través del Fondo Especial para Actividades de Emergencia y Rehabilitación de la FAO (SFERA), por la cooperación brasilera y también por el Fondo Central para la Acción en Casos de Emergencia (CERF) de la ONU.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Madagascar: Impact of Early Warning Early Action
    Protecting farming livelihoods from drought and food insecurity
    2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    There is evidence that the intensity and frequency of natural hazards and conflicts are increasing. Natural disasters now occur nearly five times as often as 40 years ago. The impact on local economies, on people's livelihoods and on lives has similarly grown. In some of the worst-hit places, it can seem unrelenting. One crisis will follow another, every time stripping away at the hard-earned but limited assets of the poorest and most vulnerable, depriving people of their self-reliance and their dignity. Globally, expanding needs, competing priorities and limited resources mean that new tools are essential to make humanitarian interventions as wisely and effectively as possible, to ensure that the impacts of crises are limited before they can grow into even more costly disasters. Support at the right time protects and empowers people the most, giving them the confidence to keep going or to resume their livelihoods. Investing in early action means FAO can help shelter longer-term development gains and increase resilience. Working with national governments and humanitarian, development and scientific partners, FAO’s Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) approach monitors risk information systems and translates warnings into anticipatory actions. Every quarter, FAO’s Early Warning Early Action report on food security and agriculture ranks risks by their likelihood and potential impact and identifies the best interventions. Then, FAO’s Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA), can release money from its early action window. These funds back tailored plans which are put into place drawing on FAO’s greatest asset – its technical knowledge and expertise in supporting rural livelihoods. Early actions are varied and flexible, ranging from cash transfers for fishing communities to safely store their nets ahead of an impending cyclone, to livestock treatments for herders as a drought approaches, to flood defences before a severe rainy season to protect crops. This study analyses the outcomes of monitoring early warnings on drought and taking targeted early actions in the south of Madagascar between 2017 and 2018. It evaluates their effectiveness and quantifies the benefits of acting early.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    The Niger and Burkina Faso: Sida’s contribution to the Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA) – Anticipatory Action window 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Sahel region is experiencing a food crisis, with 38.3 million people projected to be in acute food insecurity during this year’s lean season (June–August 2022) – a fourfold increase compared with 2019 – and millions more at risk of slipping into a crisis situation or worse. The effects of climate change in the region are worsening irregular rainfall and climatic shocks such as floods. Both Burkina Faso and the Niger are especially vulnerable to flood risk. Thanks to the contribution of the Swedish International Development Agency (Sida) to the Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA) – Anticipatory Action window, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is acting early in flood-prone areas in the Sahel through cash assistance, capacity building and veterinary support to protect the assets and livelihoods of vulnerable pastoralists.

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