Thumbnail Image

Guidelines for Quality Control of Pesticides









Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Guidance for harmonizing pesticide regulatory management in Southeast Asia 2012
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This publication is the product of a project implemented under FAO's technical cooperation programme in response to the requests by eight member countries in Southeast Asia to assist them in achieving greater regulatory harmonization. Since 1982, FAO has played an instrumental role in assisting countries in the region regulate the use of pesticides. An efficiently regulated and managed pesticide registration scheme is a prerequisite for ensuring that pesticides are useful in controlling pests an d for minimizing the potential risks to human health and the environment. The FAO International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides lays the foundation for the harmonization of pesticide regulations in Southeast Asia. The publication includes a set of five guidelines on (a) harmonization of pesticide registration, (b) harmonization of registration requirements for biopesticides, (c) harmonization of pesticide labeling, (d) harmonization of monitoring pesticide residues in a griculture products and (e) updated guidelines for the preparation of bioefficacy test protocols.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Selected Chemical Residue and Contaminant Analysis 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Food safety is an important global public health and trade matter, with chemical hazards occupying centre stage due to associated acute and chronic health outcomes. There is also an increasing need to address antimicrobial resistance concerns. While food remains a major vehicle for exposure to these hazards, related matrices cannot be ignored. Animal feed for instance may contain drug or pesticide residues as well as mycotoxins that could carry-over to food either as parent compounds or their metabolites of toxicological relevance. Contaminated water is also another medium of potential exposure to food hazards. A concerted effort is required to address the need for a safe food supply and one critical stakeholder is the testing laboratory. While this requires trained and capable analysts as well as reliable instrumentation, analytical methods are a major need. Development and validation – to ensure fitness of purpose – and availability of these methods is a necessity. This manual, consisting of several Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), presents another opportunity for laboratories to address gaps in analytical methods and/or expand their options. The manual contains techniques for analyzing certain mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, fumonisin and ochratoxin in matrices that include milk, edible vegetable oil and animal feed etc. A range of veterinary drug residues including permitted and prohibited substances in animal matrices including fish, are also addressed. Several pesticide residues in cereals, fruits and vegetables are also covered. A couple of methods for analysis of selected metals are also presented.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Assuring Food Safety and Quality. Guidelines for Strengthening National Food Control Systems
    Food and Nutrition Paper 76
    2003
    Also available in:

    Effective national food control systems are essential to protect the health and safety of domestic consumers. They are also critical in enabling countries to assure the safety and quality of their foods entering international trade and to ensure that imported foods conform to national requirements. The new global environment for food trade places considerable obligations on both importing and exporting countries to strengthen their food control systems and to implement and enforce risk-based foo d control strategies. Consumers are taking unprecedented interest in the way food is produced, processed and marketed, and are increasingly calling for their Governments to accept greater responsibility for food safety and consumer protection. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have a strong interest in promoting national food control systems that are based upon scientific principles and guidelines, and which address all sect ors of the food chain. This is particularly important for developing countries as they seek to achieve improved food safety, quality and nutrition, but will require a high level of political and policy commitment. In many countries, effective food control is undermined by the existence of fragmented legislation, multiple jurisdictions, and weaknesses in surveillance, monitoring and enforcement. These guidelines seek to provide advice to national authorities on strategies to strengthen food contr ol systems to protect public health, prevent fraud and deception, avoid food adulteration and facilitate trade. They will enable authorities to choose the most suitable options for their food control systems in terms of legislation, infrastructure and enforcement mechanisms. The document delineates the overarching principles of food control systems, and provides examples of possible infrastructures and approaches for national systems. The target users of these Guidelines are national authorities concerned with ensuring food safety and quality in the interests of public health and consumer protection. The Guidelines will also be of assistance to a range of other stakeholders including consumer groups, industry and trade organizations, farmer groups and any other groups or associations that influence national policy in this area.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.