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Support to Community Land Governance for Improved Tenure Security through Enhancing Institutional Capacity at the National and County Levels - TCP/KEN/3705









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    EU Transversal support to country implementation - Kenya
    Support to the attainment of vision 2030 through devolved land reforms in community lands of Kenya
    2019
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    Over 80 percent of the land area in Kenya is classified as arid and semi-arid (ASAL) with very low agricultural potential. Accordingly, over 80 percent of the population lives on only about 20 percent of the country. Moreover, about 70 percent of the land is kept under customary tenure systems of ownership and use, while 10 percent is classified as Government Land/Reserves, with only the remaining 20 percent being private land under statute. The main objectives of the EULGP CI is to improve food security through equitable and secure access and management of land for better livelihoods and socioeconomic development in all counties as per Vision 2030. *EULGP CI stands for European Union Land Governance Programme – Country Implementation
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    Nutrition-sensitive Farmer Field Schools in Kenya’s Kalobeyei settlement
    Strengthening the capacity of refugees and host communities to produce, process and consume nutritious food in Turkana County
    2020
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    Agriculture is the main livelihood for the majority of Kenyans, contributing 26 percent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). In rural areas, more than 70 percent of informal employment comes from agriculture. However, in the Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASALs), recurring droughts and erratic weather patterns have resulted in low productivity, food shortages and price increases, presenting significant roadblocks to nutrition. Despite progress in recent years, one in every four children under five years old (26 percent of children) in Kenya is impacted by chronic malnutrition, while acute child malnutrition rates remain high in the ASALs. Displacement and conflict have further exacerbated malnutrition and food insecurity. Kenya is host to 494 585 refugees and asylum seekers, mainly from South Sudan and Somalia. Among those, 186 000 live in Turkana County, for the most part divided between Kakuma refugee camp and Kalobeyei settlement. Interventions focusing solely on increasing agricultural production have not necessarily translated to improved nutrition or diet. Against that backdrop, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has promoted nutrition-sensitive Farmer Field Schools (FFS) providing community-facilitated training sessions on crop production and livestock, with additional one‑month nutrition modules on producing, processing, preserving and culinary preparation of foods with a high-nutrient content.
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    Combining nutrition education and rural livelihood support in Kenya
    Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs) and food related interventions in Kitui county
    2021
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    The arid and semi-arid areas (ASALs) of Kenya cover nearly 84 percent of the national land and thus present an enormous potential contribution to national agricultural production as well as basic food and income for farmers residing in these areas. About three in every ten Kenyan children aged below two years are stunted. According to the Kenya Demographic Health Survey conducted in 2014, Kitui county and West Pokot county had the highest stunting rates nationally at almost 46 percent. This is against a national average stunting rate of 26 percent. There have been multiple past projects in Kitui county that aimed at improving food security and nutrition, including through the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding, growth monitoring, immunization, complementary feeding and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH). The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Increasing Smallholder Productivity and Profitability (ISPP) project, implemented between September 2016 and March 2020, was designed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) to combine nutrition education with rural livelihood support. This approach aimed at strengthening the capacity of smallholder farmers in agricultural production, water management, and farming as a business. Furthermore, it aimed at improving nutrition outcomes of targeted household members in the semi-arid counties of Kitui, Machakos, Makueni, Taita-Taveta, and Tharaka-Nithi. The project had a specific component on Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs), aimed at improving infant and young child feeding practices.

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