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The influence of over-mature, degraded Nothofagus forests with strong anthropic disturbance on the quality of an andisol and Its gradual recovery with silvopasture in southwestern South America

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Development of country specific emission factors for reporting GHG inventory in the forestry sector
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Forest is recognized by the UNFCCC as carbon pool and removal source of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and the IPCC guidelines classify carbon pool in the LULUCF sector as above- and below-ground biomass, dead organic matter(DOM), soil organic matter(SOM), and harvested wood products(HWP). IPCC recommends developing and applying country specific emission factors(CSEFs) in consideration of the environmental characteristics of each country, and recognizes them as Tier 2 levels when applying CSEFs. This study was conducted to develop CSEFs for each carbon pool in Korea. To develop CSEFs, a total of 150 sample sites with a minimum sample size(>30) for each CSEF were collected by forest biomass and soil carbon survey standard guideline. For uncertainty assessment, the methodology presented in IPCC guidelines was evaluated. As a result, 60 CSEFs for biomass (including biomass conversion factor, biomass expansion factor and root ratio), 50 CSEFs for DOM and SOM, and 72 CSEFs for deadwood by decay classes were developed for major tree species which covered about 70% of Korean forests. The carbon fraction of deadwoods was 47-51%, which was no significant among tree species. in the caes of litter, Korean pine and Korean red pine were relatively higher than other species. The carbon fraction of soil was analyzed at 1.5 to 2.8%, and the carbon content of non-conifer tree species(2.4 to 2.8%) was higher than that of conifer tree species(1.5% to 2.0%). The uncertainty assessment showed that uncertainty of carbon conversion factor in the SOM was higher than that in the DOM, which is attributed to large variations in the amount of carbon flowing into the soil due to the inflow of DOM and their chemical composition differences. Carbon fractions for SOM and DOM developed in this study showed similar to those results in the fifth National Forest Inventory, with uncertainties similar to those in other countries. Keywords: Sustainable forest management, Climate change ID: 3623158
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    Standard operating procedure for soil microbial biomass (carbon): chloroform fumigation-extraction method 2024
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    Microbial biomass is considered as an estimation of soil biological activities and the capacity to mediate soil biochemical reactions. It is the most dynamic and labile of soil organic matter fractions, generally accounting for 1 to 5 percent of soil organic matter and very sensitive to soil management. The need to quantify soil microbiota has become increasingly relevant in current times as they are responsible for many different processes like the degradation of organic matter, the stability of aggregates and most of the nutrient cycling that occurs in soils. This standard operating procedure (SOP) focuses on the determination of soil microbial biomass using the chloroform fumigation-extraction method, which is applicable to both aerobic and anaerobic conditions over the whole range of soil pH, regardless of land use type. While chloroform fumigation also affects soil fauna, the carbon aliquot derived from these organisms is generally small (less than 5 percent) and can usually be disregarded.
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    Growth and physiological acclimation to shade in young plants of Adesmia bijuga Phil., critically endangered species in central Chile
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Adesmia bijuga Phil. is an endemic and endangered shrub species of central Chile. Its potential shade intolerance is one of the leading hypotheses for its vigor loss when the species grows beneath closed canopies. In this study we aimed to assess growth and physiological acclimation to shade in young of A. bijuga plants. A nursery experiment was established with three light levels based on the interception of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) (TRT0: control at full sun, TRT60: 60% shaded, and TRT90: 90% shaded), and maintained for 71 days during the summer season. Growth and leaf morpho-physiological responses were evaluated at the beginning, at the middle, and at the end of the experiment. The shading treatment increased plant height (H) and live crown percentage (Lcrown) compared to the control treatment at full sun. However, light-saturated photosynthetic rate (Amax), dark respiration rate (Rd), and light compensation point (Gi) were higher in TRT60 than in the other treatments.No differences were found among treatments for the apparent quantum yield (α). At this stage of plant development, our results suggest high acclimation plasticity of A. bijuga to light levels; however, a semi-shade environment (i.e., TRT60) favored a better performance of the species. Keywords: Shade tolerance, photosynthesis, light acclimation, forest restoration. ID: 3624055

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