Thumbnail Image

Food Security and Humanitarian Implications in West Africa and the Sahel. N°62 - February 2015










Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Security and Humanitarian Implications in West Africa and the Sahel. N°58 - July/August 2014 2014
    Also available in:

    The areas experiencing a late start of agropastoral campaign, benefitted from a resumption of rainfall since the end of July. However, the Atlantic coast from (i) southern Mauritania to Guinée-Bissau, (ii) northeastern Niger and (iii) northern Ghana, Nigeria and Togo recorded rainfall deficits affecting negatively the agricultural activities. The late start of the rainy season in certain areas (Chad, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal) has extended the agricultural lean season, forcing vulnerable hou seholds to adopt irreversible coping mechanisms if they don’t have access to food assistance. Pastoralists households are already facing the effects of a prolonged lean season. Livestock presents a poor body condition and in some countries of the region loss of animals have been reported (Mali, Niger and Senegal). During the lean season, localized prices increases for millet and sorghum have been observed in Burkina and in Senegal and for millet in Mali. In the eastern commercial basin, price in creases are found in the insecure zones of northern Nigeria as well as in the displaced population sites in southern Chad and in Niger. However, food products availability remains satisfactory and allows a general stability of monthly prices of coarse grains in most of West African markets. In the three West African commercial basins, the commercial flows of agricultural products are in seasonal decrease between June and July 2014 for all cereals, except for millet. Generally, the level of suppl y in local markets remains satisfying in the sub-region, except in conflict-affected areas of northern Mali, of northeastern Nigeria, of C.A.R. and in the neighboring areas. The cross-border trade of countries affected by Ebola in the western commercial basin seems to be affected, as well as trade within the affected countries following quarantine measures taken in some districts. These disturbances have negative socio-economic consequences that might affect the food security of households. As f or now, markets in Nigeria have yet to seem affected by the Ebola outbreak, but the situation is being closely monitored.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Sahel | Regional overview – December 2019 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    High levels of insecurity and inter-community conflict persist in various areas across the Sahel, particularly in parts of Burkina Faso, Mali and the Niger, significantly increasing population displacements in the region. Despite overall satisfactory agricultural production, there are significant disparities between geographical areas, with declines in cereal production expected in various countries, including Senegal. Price increases compared with the five-year average. The pastoral situation is marked by significant forage deficits in the far west of the Sahel – Senegal and Mauritania – and in parts of Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali and the Niger, which have led to early transhumance movements and the increased risk of aggravating farmer-pastoralist conflicts. According to the latest Cadre Harmonisé analysis (November 2019), 15.5 million people, including in Cameroon, are projected to be severely food insecure during next year’s lean season (June–August 2020) – an alarming deterioration that has never been observed in the last five years. This is the result of cyclical causes, including local cereal and fodder production deficits due to drought and floods, but mainly due to the worsening security situation in the region. High prevalence of acute malnutrition is also still observed, and if the security situation deteriorates further, nutrition conditions would also worsen, especially among IDPs and host communities. Providing immediate agricultural support is crucial to support the livelihoods of vulnerable displaced and host families to improve their food security and nutrition, as well as to reduce the risk of tensions over already limited natural resources
  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Security and Humanitarian Implications in West Africa and the Sahel. N°52 - January 2014 2012
    Also available in:

    In West Africa and the Sahel, cereal harvests have allowed prices to decrease across markets. However, prices are higher than their five-year averages (especially for millet and sorghum), which negatively affects vulnerable households depending on markets to meet their food requirements. Zones that experienced erratic rainfall during the rainy season, causing poor harvests and pasture deficits, will face an early lean season affecting mainly the most vulnerable households. The effects of poor ha rvests are starting to be observed in some areas in Mali (Mopti and Bandiagara), Mauritania (agropastoral, rainfed and suburban livelihood zones), Niger and Chad (Wadi Fira). The situation needs to be closely monitored to avoid any further deterioration of the food security situation. A good off-season agricultural campaign will be crucial for the people depending on agriculture in the Sahel, particularly for those that were affected by poor harvests earlier this year.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.