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An online mentoring service for small-scale livestock farmers in Benin

Good practice series - Digital agriculture










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Gender animal health and information communication technology
    Sustainable business in animal health service provision through training for veterinary paraprofessionals: Lessons learned, no. 3
    2022
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    Livestock diseases have gender implications. Women, who make up 60 percent of the world’s poor livestock keepers can be particularly affected and are therefore an important target group for last-mile animal health services. To promote the provision of comprehensive and inclusive animal health services the “Sustainable Business in Animal Health Service Provision through Training of Veterinary Paraprofessionals” project, aims to develop and evaluate a gender-sensitive training model to improve VPP services in three pilot countries: Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda. This will be done through Continuing Professional Development (CPD) delivered through a blended learning approach that includes both online and practical face-to-face training courses. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is not gender neutral. The digital divide, or existing inequalities in ICT ownership, access, and control, is closely linked to structural inequalities and gender norms and still prevents many women from reaping the benefits of ICT on a global scale. Women's limited access to ICTs is a barrier to animal health and one of the reasons why women tend to be less productive and efficient than men in livestock sector, negatively impacting household food and nutrition security. To inform the gender-sensitive project design for virtual training of VPPs, dissemination of information to smallholder farmers, and digital engagement to connect VPPs with smallholder farmers, a desk study was conducted on gender, animal health, and ICT in Africa. This report summarizes key findings and lessons learned from this research.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Developing the Layer Farm Assessment Tool (LFAT)
    Improving biosecurity and management in commercial layer farms in Indonesia
    2020
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    In order to minimize the potential spread of emerging infectious and zoonotic diseases and provide products that are safe, healthy, wholesome and halal, commercial layer farms in Indonesia need to ensure that they have good farm management practices, biosecurity, and animal health protocols in place on their farms. Good management and biosecurity can also provide positive environmental outcomes and maintain the health and financial viability of farm owners and workers. In response to this, the Food and Agriculture Organization – Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (FAO ECTAD) Indonesia and the Directorate General of Livestock and Animal Health Services (DGLAHS) developed a tool to assess the management of small to medium size layer farms. The layer farm assessment tool (LFAT) evaluates the farm activities and characteristics and provides an objective measure of farm management and biosecurity. Not only does it allow comparison of farms but it also can be used by advisory staff to suggest improvements in order to reach the quality expected of HPAI-free compartmentalization farms and receive NKV (veterinary certification) farm accreditation. The LFAT is adapted from the HPAI-free certification examination check list used by the Directorate of Animal Health (DAH, DGL&AHS). HPAI-free compartment certification is an assessment standard for poultry farms under Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture regulation No.28/Permentan/OT.140/5/2008. The adaptation is to ensure that this tool is particularly relevant to small and medium-scale layer farms. The LFAT consists of 50 sub-components amalgamated into three components - farm management, biosecurity and poultry health management. Sub-components and hence components, are ranked on a scale of zero to five with a score of 4 and above classified as ‘good’. A score between 3 and 4 as ‘average’ and below 3, the sub-component is regarded as ‘poor’. The LFAT was piloted in Blitar (East Java), Kendal (Central Java) and Purbalingga districts (Central Java) in order to test its usefulness and applicability to layer farms. The LFAT has proved to be useful in providing an objective measure on which to base advisor and farmer training programs that lead to improved farm management, reduction in disease spread and more efficient value chains and vaccination programs. It can also be used as the measuring tool for farmers to move towards NKV and HPAI-free compartmentalization certification.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Digital excellence in agriculture report
    FAO-ITU Regional contest on good practices advancing digital agriculture in Europe and Central Asia
    2023
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    This report is the outcome of the Digital Excellence in Agriculture: FAO-ITU regional contest on good practices advancing digital agriculture in Europe and Central Asia, organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Office for Europe and Central Asia and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Offices for Europe and Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Launched in November 2020, the contest sought to identify, showcase and celebrate good practices and innovative solutions that have proven successful in advancing the digital transformation of agriculture in the regions. With nearly 200 applicants from 36 countries in the regions, the initiative revealed a diverse, dynamic and future-thinking ecosystem of innovators and problem-solvers. This report summarizes the main trends in digital services and products, the most important technologies used, as well as the difficulties and challenges that arise in the development of digital agricultural applications. Presenting the 29 finalists, the report shares the key challenges applicants are addressing, the digital technologies they are using to succeed, their journeys and their plans for the near future based on the information provided. The report also analyses how the technology infrastructure, the regulatory and business environment, the availability of human capital, and the COVID-19 pandemic represented both challenges and opportunities for digital agriculture practitioners. It provides useful information for developers and service providers already active in this field or planning to enter it, as well as guidance for decision-makers on possible points of intervention.

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