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Illegal bushmeat hunting in the Okavango Delta, Botswana: Drivers, impacts and potential solutions








Access the first publication Illegal hunting and the bush-meat trade in Savanna Africa . Access the second publication, Bushmeat, wildlife-based economies, food security and conservation



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    Illegal hunting and the bush-meat trade in Savanna Africa: drivers, impacts and solutions to address the problem 2015
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    This technical publication on Bush meat, wildlife-based economies, food security and conservation: Insights into the ecological, economic, and social impacts of the bush meat trade in African savannahs is the second in an open series of FAO publications on illegal hunting and bush meat trade. This publication provides insights into the ecological, economic and social aspects of bush meat trade in Africa, as requested by FAO member countries at the 16th and 17th Session of the African Fore stry and Wildlife Commission (AFWC). Decision makers need to know the magnitude of illegal hunting and bush meat trade and the long term economic and food security benefits. The study responds to this need. This product is a result of a fruitful collaboration by FAO and Panthera, the Sustainable Use & Livelihoods Group (SULi) of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

    Access the second publication Bushmeat, wildlife-based economies, food security and conservation. Access the third publication, Illegal bushmeat hunting in the Okavango Delta, Botswana .

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    Document
    Bushmeat, wildlife-based economies, food security and conservation: Insights into the ecological and social impacts of the bushmeat trade in African savannahs 2015
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    This technical publication, Bushmeat, wildlife-based economies, food security and conservation: Insights into the ecological and social impacts of the bushmeat trade in African savannahs, is the second in an open series of FAO publications on illegal hunting and the bushmeat trade. The publication provides insights into the ecological and social aspects of the bushmeat trade in Africa, as requested by FAO member countries at the 16th and 17th Sessions of the African Forestry and Wildlif e Commission (AFWC).

    Access the first publication Illegal hunting and the bush-meat trade in Savanna Africa . Access the third publication, Illegal Bushmeat Hunting in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

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    Project
    Interventions to Improve the Food Security of Communities in Wildlife-Dominated Landscapes in Northern Botswana - TCP/BOT/3601 2020
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    Wildlife-based tourism plays an integral part in the economy of Botswana. In 2015, tourism was estimated to have represented 12 percent of Botswana’s gross domestic product and to have generated 32 000 direct and 69 500 indirect jobs. The tourism industry and associated livelihoods are dependent on the effective management and protection of the country’s wildlife resources. The Okavango Delta, a World Heritage Site, is the focus of Botswana’s tourism industry and hosts a large number of tourism facilities. However, there is concern that wildlife populations in the Delta are declining; recent research indicates that the poaching of animals for bushmeat is potentially a major contributing factor. Poaching for bushmeat provides relatively limited livelihood benefits for the individuals involved, but places the livelihoods of much larger numbers of local people at risk by jeopardizing the tourism industry and its thousands of associated jobs, as well as by exacerbating wildlife conflict issues for local livestock farmers. Bushmeat poaching results in the destruction of significant quantities of wildlife but captures a tiny fraction of the value of the wildlife killed. Two key drivers for bushmeat poaching in the Okavango Delta are a lack of opportunity for some communities to access legal benefits from wildlife and the high costs imposed on communities in the form of human-wildlife conflict. Poaching is facilitated in some parts of the Delta by the vastness of the ecosystem combined with various logistical and financial limitations confronting the authorities commissioned with protection of the resources. The aim of the project was to address these issues.

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