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Aquaculture possibilities in some islands of the South Pacific









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    Document
    South Pacific Islands - Reef and lagoon productivity
    A report prepared for the Fisheries Development Agency Project
    1972
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    Reefs and lagoons are associated with most South Pacific Islands and with all atolls. They are integral parts of the human habitats of these regions, protect the land, form harbours and provide high protein food but despite their importance and recognized value, information about them is usually fragmentary. Evidence shows that the finely balanced reef-lagoon biological system can be disturbed by careless exploitation and other human activities. Imbalances in the natural components occur and ma ny of their fisheries are underproductive because of over-fishing. Failure to develop management and conservation practices in keeping with population growth, tourism and pollution can cause island environments and fisheries to become depleted. Fishery production from the reefs and lagoons can be enhanced and stabilized through management and considerable increases in production are possible through expanding the fishing areas and improving techniques. Further expansion is possible through caref ul and thoughtful manipulation of the environments.
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    Pacific Island Fisheries - regional and country information 2002
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      In general, the Pacific Islands increase in size from east to west. Most islands rise steeply from the deep ocean floor and have very little underwater shelf area. Coral reefs characteristically surround the islands, either close to the shore (fringing reef) or further offshore (barrier reef), in which case a coastal lagoon is enclosed. The area includes many atolls, which are the remnt barrier reefs of islands that have subsided. Some of the more recent islands in the area lack coral reefs. M angrove forests often border the inshore waters, especially of the larger islands, and provide habitat for the juveniles of many important food fish. Because of the relatively small size of most islands, major bodies of fresh water are not widespread in the sub-region, with substantial rivers and lakes only being found in some of the larger islands of Melanesia. The small land areas of most islands create limited freshwater and nutrient runoff, resulting in low enrichment of the nearby sea. The ocean waters of the area are usually clear and low in productivity. Upwellings occur in the boundaries between currents and in other localized areas, and have important implications for the harvesting of marine resources. The dispersed ture of the region’s land among this vast area of water has several consequences for fisheries magement. In regard to inshore resources, the presence of numerous patches of land and their associated coastal and coral reef areas, separated by large distances and so metimes abyssal depths, means that many species with limited larval dispersal can be effectively maged as unit stocks. On the other hand, magement of shared stocks of highly migratory species such as tus can only be effective if carried out on a multi-country basis. The presence of extensive areas of intertiol waters (high seas) among the region’s EEZs greatly complicates the region’s fishery magement efforts. Fishery Statistics in the Region The long time series of FAO catch statistics used in the compilation of the Catch Profiles for other regions are aggregated by FAO Statistical Area and thus cannot be used where the region to be reviewed incorporates parts of one or more areas, as is the case with the Pacific Islands. In addition, much of the region’s tu catch is taken by distant-water fishing tions (DWFNs) and is thus reported by FAO in the catches of other statistical areas. 
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Fisheries of the Pacific Islands: Regional and national information 2011
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    The Pacific Island region consists of fourteen independent countries and eight territories located in the western and central Pacific Ocean. These comprise about 200 high islands and some 2500 low islands and atolls. Coastal fishing is of fundamental importance in the Pacific Islands. Much of the region's nutrition, welfare, culture, employment, and recreation are based on the living resources in the zone between the shoreline and the outer reefs. The continuation of current lifestyles, th e opportunities for future development and food security are all highly dependent on coastal fisheries resources. Although dwarfed in both volume and value by the offshore tuna fisheries, the Pacific Island fisheries that are based on coastal resources provide most of the non-imported fish supplies to the region. Coastal fisheries harvest a very diverse range of finfish, invertebrates and algae. Unlike the tuna fishery, virtually all the coastal catch is undertaken by Pacific Island ers themselves, with very little access by foreign fishing vessels. This publication presents information on coastal and offshore fisheries in the region. The information is broken down into resource categories, the major types of fishing, the important species, the status of those resources, and the fisheries management that occurs. The book also provides supplementary sectoral and governance related information on the fisheries in the 14 independent Pacific Island countries.

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