Thumbnail Image

Legal guide on school food and nutrition

Legislating for a healthy school food environment












Cruz, L. 2020. Legal Guide on school food and nutrition - Legislating for a healthy school food environment. FAO Legal Guide No. 2. Rome, FAO





Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Responsible investments in agriculture and food systems – A practical handbook for parliamentarians and parliamentary advisors 2020
    Also available in:

    This Practical Handbook is directed to Members of Parliament and Parliamentary Advisors, who are considered “change agents”. It provides a comprehensive and systematic overview of the role that Parliamentarians can play in the creation of reliable, coherent, and transparent “enabling environments” in the range of areas related to investment in agriculture and food systems. The Handbook does so, not through a catalog of prescriptions, but through guidance notes, examples of good practices, and very practical indications. It does not aim to provide a blueprint to be implemented by each Parliament but rather it sets out key stages of processes and mechanisms for MPs and advisors to consider while promoting responsible investment in agriculture and food systems. Part 1 of the Handbook presents the Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems and explains:
    • why there is an urgent need to enhance responsible investment in agriculture and food systems: high levels of malnutrition and poverty (exacerbated by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic), population growth and urbanization, increasing demand for more resource-intensive diets, climate change, and its severe impacts;
    • what is responsible investment in agriculture and food systems: “Responsible investment in agriculture and food systems contributes to sustainable development by generating positive socio-economic and environmental impacts, enhancing food security and nutrition. It requires progressively respecting, protecting and fulfilling human rights”;
    • and how can it contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and national development plans - scaling up support to small scale farmers, engaging and empowering youth, closing the gender gap, and improving access to infrastructure, public services, and agricultural finance, and, in general, investing in the sustainable production of safe and nutritious food while contributing to improving inclusion in the food system, prioritizing vulnerable populations and adopting a human rights-based approach to food security, in line with the SDGs spirit of addressing inequalities and ensuring that no one is left behind.
    In Part 2, through specific Guidance Notes, Parliamentarians and advisors are guided through concrete actions they can implement in their countries to improve and increase investments, actions such as: executing a national policy, legislative, and institutional frameworks assessment; ensuring consistency in the legal and policy framework; advocating to reform existing laws and/or adopt new laws; ensuring adequate financing for the implementation of laws related to responsible investments in agriculture and food systems and ensuring effective parliamentary oversight are detailed throughout.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    School Food and Nutrition
    Boosting school-based policies and programmes for an enhanced impact on child nutrition, community development and local food system transformation
    2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Poor diets and malnutrition have adverse effects on children’s health, school performance and ability to learn, reducing their productivity and earning potential and, with it, their country’s human capital. Current food systems are not delivering healthy diets for all and are marked by critical inequities along the production-consumption continuum– from stark disparities in the distribution of inputs, services and opportunities among food supply chain actors (such as rural smallholder farmers), to restrictive access to nutritious foods in vulnerable groups (such as low-income children and women). School-based policies and programmes have been recognized globally as a means of addressing some of these interconnected issues, yet, despite commendable progress by many countries, there are persistent challenges that impair their success. For instance, synergies between food and agriculture, nutrition, education, social protection and other interventions implemented through schools are not fully realized. Impact is not usually measured and efforts are often small-scale or fragmented. FAO’s School Food and Nutrition (SFN) Framework is a direct response to the call for better nutrition and food system transformation in the context of the SDGs and the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016–2025). The Framework is based on a holistic approach that seeks synergies between policy, programmatic and institutional actions along the school food environment, nutrition education, value chain development and local procurement of school food.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Home-Grown School Feeding Resource Framework
    Technical Document
    2018
    This Resource framework is intended as a guidance tool for stakeholders involved in programme design, implementation and monitoring of Home-Grown School Feeding Programmes and the related policy and institutional environment, including, inter alia: governments and development partners providing technical and financial assistance, as well as civil society, community based organisations and the private sector. It is a knowledge product that harmonizes the existing approaches and tools, and builds on the wealth of expertise and experience with home grown school feeding models i.e. those designed to provide children in schools with safe, diverse and nutritious food, sourced locally from smallholders, with multiple impacts on Sustainable Development Goals. This knowledge product contains a discussion of concepts, issues and experience , as well as other considerations and elements of relevance to home grown school feeding programmes. This lays the ground for a community of practice to support innovation and learning, as well as replication, adaptation and expansion of successful models of interventions, for impact at scale.This publication is the result of a broad based collaborative effort initiated and coordinated by the World Food Programme. It is authored by a team composed of experts from Rome-based Agencies including the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the World Food Programme and from other partners including the Global Child Nutrition Foundation, the Partnership for Child Development, the New Partnership for Africa’s Development and the World Food Programme Centre of Excellence in Brazil. It has benefited from comprehensive reviews and wide consultations among the partner organizations at global, regional and country level, as well as with experts and members of various governments and relevant stakeholders at several relevant venues for learning and policy dialogue.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.