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Report of the regional training workshop on post- harvest fish losses in small-scale fisheries, Mangochi, Malawi, 11–15 June 2012

GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project











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    Regional Training Workshop on Improved Fish Smoking Using The Thyarore System. Tanzania
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The Indian Ocean Commission through the SmartFish programme, in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), is implementing a regional fisheries strategy programme aimed at improving the sustainable regional supply of fish and fishery products. The programme has five different result areas, the fifth one being food security, which primarily focuses on the implementation of activities geared at reducing post-harvest fish losses that occur in small-scale f isheries. Regarding post-harvest fish loss reduction, the approach of SmartFish is to build on what has already been done in the region. More specifically, to build the capacity of various key institutions in the region in terms of a systematic application of fish loss assessment methodologies in small-scale fisheries as a precondition for rational intervention, and indeed to find practical ways to reduce such losses. In line with the above, the Fisheries Education and Training Agency (FETA), in collaboration with FAO-SmartFish, organized a regional training workshop on improved fish smoking using the Thyarore system, which was held in Mwanza, Tanzania, from 04 – 08 November 2013. Seventeen participants from Kenya, Burundi, Rwanda, United Republic of Tanzania, and Uganda took part in the training. Participants were Fisheries Officers from the respective countries. The competency-based training programme had two main learning outcomes: participants are able to design and construct a Thy arore system oven/kiln; participants are able to smoke fish using the Thyarore system. The training was conducted by experienced experts from FETA and Senegal who employed a variety of hands-on type training methods and practical sessions. The pre- and post-evaluation suggested that the teaching-learning process was appreciated. Likewise, the participants’ perception of the training was generally high and observations from the post training evaluation indicated that many are now planning to intr oduce FAO-Thyarore Technology systems in their respective countries.
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    Regional training on post-harvest loss assessment methodology. Dar es Salaam and Mwanza, Tanzania
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    High post-harvest fish loss is one of the major challenges to small-scale fisheries, especially in Africa where malnutrition and food insecurity are rampant. Reductions in these losses have been hampered by a lack of data and compounded by existing complexities in small-scale fisheries, including the multiplicity of species, fishing gear and methods, as well as the number of landing sites. Despite the numerous challenges, efforts have been made to develop methodologies to assess losses. Today, i t is widely acknowledged that three loss assessment methods (IFLAM, LT and QLAM) can be used to collect adequate data and information on post- harvest fish losses for rational practical interventions. The efficiency and effectiveness of these three methods could be further improved with the use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) such as mobile phone technology. It was with this in mind that the FAO/SmartFish programme, in collaboration with the Fisheries Education and Training Agency in Tanzania, planned, organized and implemented a regional training workshop on post-harvest fish loss assessment methodology, which was held from 28 January to 2 February 2013 in the United Republic of Tanzania. The main objective of the training workshop was to disseminate technology-based post- harvest fish loss assessment methodology among key small-scale fisheries practitioners in the region. This activity is part of FAO/SmartFish initiatives to support beneficiary countries to reduce post- harvest losses and consequently improve the regional supply of fish and fish products. This competency-based training workshop had two principle learning outcomes: participants are able to carry out post-harvest fish loss assessments in small-scale fisheries; are able to record and send data to the database through the use of a mobile phone. To facilitate greater practical demonstrations, the majority of the training took place in the field, at fish landing sites and markets. Twenty-two particip ants from nine different countries took part in the workshop: Burundi, Djibouti, Kenya, North Sudan, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda, Madagascar and Tanzania. Resource persons were from FAO, SmartFish and FETA.
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    Post-harvest practices for empowering women in small-scale fisheries in Africa
    Successful outcomes and guidance
    2022
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    Post-harvest challenges faced by small-scale fisheries stakeholders have been the focus of numerous projects, programmes and investments in Africa. Many of these initiatives have aimed to benefit women, who often dominate processing and trade activities. This report provides a summary of key findings from a desk review and primary data research that has aimed to identify successful post-harvest initiatives related to infrastructure design and management, improved post-harvest technology, value addition and access to finance. The examples described could be used by development practitioners and policy makers to inform the direction, design and implementation of future post-harvest fisheries initiatives. The use of locally made fish boxes to improve on board handling and the use of drying racks are described. And although the intention was to focus on small-pelagic fish value chains, some of the examples have a more general application such as those for infrastructure, value addition and the microfinance models that are included. It is important to note that this is not a definitive study and that the focus has been primarily on initiatives is Ghana, Malawi, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tanzania and Uganda. The report and guidance align with and aim to support the implementation of the FAO Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines). The guidelines promote the role of SSFs in food security and nutrition, the right to adequate food, equitable development and poverty alleviation, and to the provision of decent work for fishers and fish workers.

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