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Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #7, 14 September 2022

Monthly Report on Food Price Trends












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    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #4, 11 May 2022
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    International prices of coarse grains fell in April as maize harvests in Argentina and Brazil helped ease pressure on maize markets. By contrast, wheat prices edged upwards as global supply tightness persisted amidst the significantly reduced exports from Ukraine due to war-related impacts on export supply chains. For rice, strong Asian demand and weather setbacks in the Americas drove international prices up during April. In West Africa, new record high prices of coarse grains were reported in several countries, driven by a seasonal uptick in demand, lower cross‑border trade flows and higher international commodity prices. Conflicts in the Sahel and weak currencies in coastal countries added upward pressure on domestic prices. In East Africa, prices of coarse grains remained firm or increased further in April and continued to be well above their year-earlier levels across the subregion. Exceptionally high price levels continued to prevail in South Sudan and the Sudan. In Far East Asia, in Sri Lanka, prices of rice and wheat flour increased further in April to new highs mostly due to the sustained effects of precipitous currency depreciation and the below-average 2022 “Maha” crop output. In South America, prices of wheat in April remained significantly higher year on year and at record highs in some countries, owing to strong international demand in exporting countries and elevated international quotations in net-importing countries.
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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #5, 11 June 2024
    Monthly report on food price trends
    2024
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    International prices of all major cereals increased in May 2024. Significant increases were registered for wheat export prices, reflecting concerns about the impacts of unfavourable crop conditions in major producing countries, while maize export prices rose due to various factors. The FAO All Rice Price Index also increased in May, driven by higher Indica quotations. In many countries monitored by FAO, domestic staple food prices remained at high levels in April and May 2024, underpinned by adverse weather events, conflict-related disruptions to supply chains and macroeconomic difficulties contributing to high food distribution costs. The lingering effect of prolonged conflict and insecurity remained a major driver of the high food prices in Haiti, Myanmar, South Sudan, the Sudan and Sahelian countries. In Southern Africa and Argentina, the anticipated year-on-year decline in the maize output sustained upward pressure on prices, amidst ongoing harvests. In South America and Far East Asia, rice prices were generally higher year-on-year in the major producing countries despite seasonal harvest downward pressure.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #5, 14 June 2023
    Monthly report on food price trends
    2023
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    International prices of wheat and maize continued to decline in May, while rice prices increased further. The downward trend in wheat prices was mostly due to ample global supplies and subdued import demand, while an expected record crop in Brazil and higher production in the United States of America were largely behind the decline in maize prices. The extension of the Black Sea Grain Initiative also contributed to softening world prices. By contrast, international rice quotations continued their upward trend in May, as previous deals with Asian buyers were executed and supplies tightened in some exporters, such as Viet Nam and Pakistan. In most countries monitored by FAO, domestic staple food prices in May 2023 remained above their year‑earlier levels. Conflict and insecurity, adverse weather, high prices of agricultural inputs, elevated distribution costs as well as currency weaknesses continue to be the major drivers. Coarse grain prices remained considerably high in East and West Africa, while harvests eased the pressure on maize prices in Southern Africa and South America. In Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia countries and East Asia, ample stocks and supplies from ongoing harvests contributed to the softening of wheat and wheat flour prices. Meanwhile, in East Asia, domestic rice prices increased in major exporting countries despite harvest pressures weighing on prices in other countries of the subregion.

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