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FAO/INFOODS Evaluation framework to assess the quality of published food composition tables and databases

User guide








Download the evaluation framework that accompanies this publication


Charrondiere, U.R., Stadlmayr, B., Grande, F., Vincent, A., Oseredczuk, M., Sivakumaran, S., Puwastien, P., Judprasong, K., Haytowitz, D. & Gnagnarella, P. 2023. FAO/INFOODS Evaluation framework to assess the quality of published food composition tables and databases - User guide. Rome, FAO.



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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO/INFOODS Guidelines for Checking Food Composition Data prior to the Publication of a User Table/Database-Version 1.0 2012
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    Food composition data play an essential role in many sectors, including nutrition, health, agriculture, environment, food labelling and trade (Burlingame, 2004; Greenfield and Southgate, 2003; Pennington, 2008). Over the last 25 years, INFOODS has developed many international standards, guidelines and tools to obtain harmonized food composition data. They contain criteria for analytical data, guidelines on component identifiers, data compilation, food nomenclature, interchange and quality evalua tion (INFOODS, 2012a; Greenfield and Southgate, 2003; Klensin et al., 1989; Rand et al., 1991; Truswell et al.,1991). They were supplemented by guidelines from others such as EuroFIR (EuroFIR, 2012a; Westenbrink et al., 2009). However, as there are no guidelines on the validation/verification of data prior to publishing them in a user table/database (DB), INFOODS and FAO decided to develop such guidelines through the INFOODS network. The document was constructed on the assumption that the user t able/DB was developed according to the criteria set by Greenfield and Southgate (2003, pp.14-15) as outlined in Figure 1. It reflects the different stages of food composition database management until the production of user tables/DBs. Checks should be performed at all levels of the food composition database (FCDB) and a final check is recommended before the release of a user table/DB. The checks described in this document are related to compiled/aggregated data before publication in user tables /DBs. The objective of this document is to outline comprehensively the internal checks to be carried out on the food composition data and documentation prior to their publication in the user table/DB (section 3). For those compilers not yet familiar with the compilation and publication procedures of food composition data, a section on general issues (section 2) was added to give a brief overview of important issues which are useful for a better understanding of the checks and for keeping the c hecks as short as possible, i.e. without the need for further explanations. which provide further useful information for those with less experience in database compilation
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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO/INFOODS/IZiNCG Global food composition database for phytate - version 1.0 (PhyFoodComp1.0)
    User guide
    2018
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    This User Guide refers to the FAO/INFOODS Global Food Composition Database for Phytate (PhyFoodComp), and contains the documentation of the data. It has been developed to help users make the best use of the database. The PhyFoodComp database is the first global repository of analytical data on phytate in its different forms and determined by different chemical methods, as well as of iron, zinc, calcium, water, and different phytate:mineral molar ratios. This database is important as phytate, mainly contained in pulses and cereals, is considered an anti-nutrient because it interferes with the absorption of minerals, especially of iron and zinc. The PhyFoodComp database will provide food composition compilers, nutritionists and researchers with access to good quality analytical phytate data and bibliography. Emphasis is put on demonstrating variations in phytate contents and their influencing factors. The aim of PhyFoodComp is to • demonstrate best ways to reduce phytate contents in foods and recipes; • motivate users to include phytate data into national or regional food composition tables or databases; • design better diets for mineral deficiencies; • develop well-targeted nutrition projects, programmes and interventions related to mineral deficiencies such as iron and zinc; and • reconsider re-evaluating the impact of phytate in diets on the bioavailability of iron and zinc when establishing their nutrient requirements. The PhyFoodComp database is accessible on www.fao.org/infoods/infoods/tables-and-databases
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    Booklet
    Global nutrient conversion table for FAO supply utilization accounts 2024
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    High-quality food compositional data are crucial to obtain adequate results in research education, health claims and policy decisions. This document describes the development of a global set of energy, nutrient values and edible portion coefficients for the FAO Supply Utilization Accounts (SUA). The SUA statistics are published on FAOSTAT, the largest global database offering free access to food, agriculture, fisheries, forestry, natural resources management and nutrition statistics. Until 2023, the statistics published by FAO include energy and macronutrients (protein and fat) only, meaning that no statistics for vitamins or minerals were previously available. This user guide provides background information on the development of the Global Nutrient Conversion Table (NCT) for SUA, underlining the methodology and principles applied. The Global NCT for SUA consists of 435 food items for crops and livestock and 95 food items for fish and other aquatic products, totalling 530 items. Each SUA item was matched with food composition data from selected high-quality food composition tables from different countries and regions. The energy and nutrient values present an average profile for each food item listed in the SUA.Download the Nutrient conversion table for SUA that accompanies this publication.

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