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Supporting Sericulture Rehabilitation








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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
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    Document
    Sericulture: An Alternative Source of Income to Enhance the Livelihoods of Small-scale Farmers and Tribal Communities
    Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living from Livestock
    2009
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    This paper provides a summary review of the development and implementation of BAIF’s sericulture programme in the Indian state of Maharashtra. BAIF Development Research Foundation (BAIF), a national NGO based in Pune, Maharashtra, has been active in developing and promoting better livelihood options for the rural poor in the country. BAIF adopted a multi-pronged strategic approach by introducing a technology-based integrated farming model, empowering and capacitating communities to take the lead in implementation and marketing of the produce, but providing strong backup support with an effective monitoring system. This paper provides an overview of the technological innovations that resulted from BAIF’s on-station and on-farm experimentation, the economics of sericulture along the entire value chain from cocoon to raw silk to silk fabric, and the environmental impact of two forms of sericulture – smallholder farmers using planted mulberry trees and tribal communities, relying on Arjuna / Asan trees in natural forests to feed the silkworms.
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    Article
    Land use and land use changes by the farmers from mulberry (Morus alba) plantations to green forest tree based farming for income growth and sustainability in Malda district of India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Malda district was famous for two economic activities viz. Mango (Mangifera indica) cultivation and rearing mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mori). Earlier silkworm rearing was a flourishing cottage industry and every households of Kaliachak block reared silkworm for cocoon production. It was the major livelihood of rural farmers but they suffered heavily due to cheap import of silk from China. Thus, the backbone of farmers was crippled, hence they started cultivating various trees in mulberry fields along with agricultural crops for sustaining their livelihood. Present study was undertaken to know how farmers adjusted to new situation, their knowledge about trees, income growth and sustainability. It was observed that mulberry was raised as herb and leaves were fed to the silkworm larvae at home. Traditionally farmers planted Dalbergia sissoo trees on the border of mulberry fields but later on they started planting other trees. A few farmers uprooted their mulberry bushes and converted to Swietenia macrophylla plantation. Some farmers converted their entire land to Mango and Litchi chinensis orchards for long term gains. Besides, some traditional farmers, around 10% still continued with silkworm rearing for their livelihood security but planted few rows of trees like Tectona grandis, D.sissoo, Bombax ceiba, S.macrophylla and Acacia auriculiformis. Few big farmers converted their mulberry fields into ponds for fishery, however, planted Mango and Sissoo on border. The first crops inside the tree plantations were Maize, Papaya and Vegetables which gave farmers quick income. Later, Banana and Citrus were planted. These activities are still continuing, but timber harvesting has also started which will give high returns. These forest tree based land changes not only provided sustainable income growth to farmers, but also made them drought resilient leading to climate change mitigation and adaptation besides conserving plant biodiversity. Key words: Landscape management, Agriculture, Biodiversity conservation ID: 3475637
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Sericulture: An Alternative Source of Income to Enhance the Livelihoods of Small-scale Farmers and Tribal Communities
    Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living from Livestock
    2009
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper provides a summary review of the development and implementation of BAIF’s sericulture programme in the Indian state of Maharashtra. BAIF Development Research Foundation (BAIF), a national NGO based in Pune, Maharashtra, has been active in developing and promoting better livelihood options for the rural poor in the country. BAIF adopted a multi-pronged strategic approach by introducing a technology-based integrated farming model, empowering and capacitating communities to take the lead in implementation and marketing of the produce, but providing strong backup support with an effective monitoring system. This paper provides an overview of the technological innovations that resulted from BAIF’s on-station and on-farm experimentation, the economics of sericulture along the entire value chain from cocoon to raw silk to silk fabric, and the environmental impact of two forms of sericulture – smallholder farmers using planted mulberry trees and tribal communities, relying on Arjuna / Asan trees in natural forests to feed the silkworms.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Land use and land use changes by the farmers from mulberry (Morus alba) plantations to green forest tree based farming for income growth and sustainability in Malda district of India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Malda district was famous for two economic activities viz. Mango (Mangifera indica) cultivation and rearing mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mori). Earlier silkworm rearing was a flourishing cottage industry and every households of Kaliachak block reared silkworm for cocoon production. It was the major livelihood of rural farmers but they suffered heavily due to cheap import of silk from China. Thus, the backbone of farmers was crippled, hence they started cultivating various trees in mulberry fields along with agricultural crops for sustaining their livelihood. Present study was undertaken to know how farmers adjusted to new situation, their knowledge about trees, income growth and sustainability. It was observed that mulberry was raised as herb and leaves were fed to the silkworm larvae at home. Traditionally farmers planted Dalbergia sissoo trees on the border of mulberry fields but later on they started planting other trees. A few farmers uprooted their mulberry bushes and converted to Swietenia macrophylla plantation. Some farmers converted their entire land to Mango and Litchi chinensis orchards for long term gains. Besides, some traditional farmers, around 10% still continued with silkworm rearing for their livelihood security but planted few rows of trees like Tectona grandis, D.sissoo, Bombax ceiba, S.macrophylla and Acacia auriculiformis. Few big farmers converted their mulberry fields into ponds for fishery, however, planted Mango and Sissoo on border. The first crops inside the tree plantations were Maize, Papaya and Vegetables which gave farmers quick income. Later, Banana and Citrus were planted. These activities are still continuing, but timber harvesting has also started which will give high returns. These forest tree based land changes not only provided sustainable income growth to farmers, but also made them drought resilient leading to climate change mitigation and adaptation besides conserving plant biodiversity. Key words: Landscape management, Agriculture, Biodiversity conservation ID: 3475637

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