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The potential cure for COVID-19: The role of medicinal non wood forestal products and the promising public policies for its use in pandemics times

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Forest and human health with special reference to India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Forests are intricately linked with human health for physical, mental, and social wellbeing. India has traditionally followed culture of living in and around forests. Atmospheric pollution in urban areas (due to industrialization) increases the risk of various respiratory and heart diseases. Trees not only mitigate the greenhouse effect but also absorb toxic chemicals and particulate matter, thus acting like human liver in this way. A visit to green urban areas acts like a stress buster and recharges the batteries. This has resulted in development of urban forestry hubs, creating small areas of trees: herbs and shrubs under various names such as city forest, parks, smriti/rashi/nakshatra van etc. Planting of species which may create problems as pollen pollution/wind damage/ lowering groundwater table /other kind, needs to be avoided. Forests are the largest repositories of a large variety of medicinal plants. Various medicinal systems such as Ayurveda, Allopathy, homeopathy, Unani, tribal, alternative medicine use raw material from forest. Importance of Medicinal plants has increased over the last few decades with environmental restrictions on felling of trees. Herbal remedies in India are now the responsibility of Ayush Ministry, Government of India. National Medicine Plants Board coordinates overall conservation, cultivation, trade and export of medicinal plant sector in India. A referenced digital data base from published sources is now in place. Demand and supply of medicinal plants along with list of suitable species for various ago -climatic zones has been prepared. Medicinal plants now find a proper place in the management plans of various forest divisions. To boost the cultivation of medicinal plants, a lot of grey areas have to be addressed. Government of India is already exploring possibility of long-term Public Private partnerships in degraded forests for this purpose also. Keywords: One Health, Human health and well-being, Genetic resources, Innovation, Knowledge management. ID: 3484385
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    Traditional knowledge and uses of medicinal plants in Jharkhand state of India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Jharkhand, an eastern state of India , is abound in medicinal plants and rich in related indigenous and traditional knowledge. The tribals like Santhal, Ho, Birhor, Oraon, Munda, and Bhumij use powder, oil, paste, juice and decoction of these plants to cure various diseases. Since time immemorial, forest has been the main source of medicinal plants. But due to extensive use of these plants and deforestation, some of the medicinal plants are on the verge of extinction. Similarly traditional knowledge (TK) related to conservation and sustainable use of these plants are also threatened due to acculturation in the society. The present paper depicts TK related to conservation and uses of medicinal plants in Jharkhand state of India. The study was conducted in Dhanbad, Bokaro, Gumla, East Singhbhum (Jamshedpur) ,West Singhbhum (Chaibasa) and Hazaribagh districts of Jharkhand. The survey was done in two steps-Reconnaissance survey and Survey for actual research work with questionnaires. During study fifty plants were recorded eg. Abrus precatorius L., Acorus calamus L., Adhatoda zeylanica Medic. , Allemanda cathartica L., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Bacopa monniera (L.) , Clitoria ternatea L, Hemidesmus indicus R.Br ,Vitex negundo L., Ocimum sanctum L., Rauvolfia serpentina (L.)Benth.exKurtz, Terminalia tomentosa (DC) Wt. & Arn, Terminalia Arjuna (Roxb. exDC.) Wt. & Arn., Trachyspermum ammi (L.)Spr. etc. The study reveals that these people possess comprehensive TK for treatment of various ailments like cough, cold, fever, jaundice, skin diseases, wounds etc. using these plants. Due to their utility local people could conserve these plants for a long period of time as sacred groves, by adopting sustainable methods, following taboo and respecting traditional spirits. Conservation of such traditional wisdom and biodiversity is required; hence besides other measures, documentation of this knowledge as educational material is also recommended. Keywords: Human health and well -being, Biodiversity conservation, Knowledge management,Disease transmission , Sustainable forest management ID: 3485638
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    Drones - A feasible way to revive forests
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The role of forests in human survival is inevitable but the forest cover decreases by deforestation increased wildfires and unpredictable climate change. To regrow forest we need a lot of manpower and as per some estimates a human can plant about 1500 trees a day and there are many inaccessible places like mountains, river beds, which is not easy for human planters to go, carry, and plant trees. To combat this we need to find out effective mechanisms to plant a large volume of tree seeds in a stipulated period over a mass area. The feasible solution for this is the usage of drones in reviving forests. Drones are unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), they are like small helicopters which can be flown by a person standing on the ground using a remote.

    Drones can fly and drop seeds at places that were difficult to reach earlier. They can map out the territory, carry the seeds, and drop the load at the identified spots, and go back to check the progress at frequent intervals and creating a large-scale green landscape. The built of the drone for planting trees are designed to be durable enough to lift the high quantity of seeds and they mark the areas suitable for dropping the seeds using machine learning technologies and 3D imaging. The seeds used in the drones are highly recommended to use a protected nutrient coating that acts as a safe shell to bury them in the ground, protect them from animals, and be flown away.

    Forests still cover about 30 percent of the world’s land area, but they are disappearing at an alarming rate. About 17 percent of the Amazonian rainforest has been destroyed over the past 50 years, and losses recently have been on the rise. Given the ferocity of the devastation, we need hundreds of companies, individuals, and groups to come forward, leverage the technology, take these aerial vehicles to the sky and make the planet green again. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Biodiversity conservation, Climate change, Sustainable forest management ID: 3616686

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