Thumbnail Image

Five steps to successful ecological restoration of mangroves






Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Mangrove restoration in Oman
    FAO framework strategy for the mangrove restoration project in Oman
    2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Oman has a total mangrove forest coverage of at least 10.9km2, there are proposed projects in 6 key areas; for example, the Oman Blue Carbon project aims to plant 100 million mangrove trees across the Sultanate of Oman. FAO will conduct a national consultation workshop to define the targeted area based on the need of restoration as well the approved restoration strategy that was produced by JICA (while these aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 14 million tonnes and generate an estimated economic benefit of around $150 million.)
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Community-led place-based mangrove ecosystems conservation in West Mexico
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Mangroves are biodiversity- and carbon-rich socio-ecological ecosystems that provide essential goods and services to millions of people. In particular, food, medicine, and wood, which is the primary source of energy and construction material for several Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) living in coastal areas. Mangrove loss and degradation occur at alarming rates putting at risk the traditional livelihoods of IPLCs. Community-led mangrove conservation could be a cost-effective solution to conserve mangrove forests, their ecosystem services, and biological diversity within and beyond protected areas. Although community-based mangrove conservation is a common practice, few successful case studies are known. In West Mexico, IPLCs have been conserving and managing mangrove ecosystems for decades to produce mangrove wood for both domestic and commercial purposes. Through participatory planning, zones have been designated for conservation, wood production, water bodies protection, and restoration. Historical mangrove cover change analysis for the periods 1970/1980, 2005 and 2010 revealed forest expansion within the community-led conserved area (UMA), including in wood production zones. West Mexico is a unique case study that could provide valuable mangrove conservation best practices and lessons learned to other communities around the world. This community-based conservation strategy may contribute to achieving national and international environmental and biodiversity targets by providing multiple socio-ecological and economic benefits from local to global scales if implemented with a rights-based conservation perspective that incorporates multidisciplinary and participatory scientific assessments and traditional knowledge. It could also enhance sustainable local traditional livelihoods and biocultural practices while reducing illegal logging and contributing to mitigating the effects of climate change and biodiversity loss through nature-based solutions. Keywords: Rights-based Conservation; Sustainable Livelihoods; Community-based Decision-making;Mangroves; Community-led Nature-based Solutions ID: 3487429
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Modeling CO2 restoration potential of mangrove ecosystems in Pakistan to support urban green spaces and human well-being
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Abstract: Pakistan is facing major climate change challenges since in recent years, the annual mean temperature has increased by 0.5°C in the country. Karachi is the largest city and highly vulnerable to fatal heatwave events trolling maximum deaths and illness in recent years. Coast of Mangrove Forest (MF) plays an important role in daily temperature, local environment, and microclimatic conditions. It is a well-established scientific reality that carbon traps heat in the air, and now observing a dramatic rise in temperature. The study aimed to evaluate the vulnerability of the communities to heat-stress, and categorize the role of Mangrove Ecosystem Services to mitigate future disasters. Coupled models and GIS/RS tools were used to estimate the suitability of MF land-cover to categorize the latent status. Heatwaves during summer for three days were calibrated by the models which resulted that an inundation of CO2 stress factors, 250 (S-u=1.0) with a rise in temperature up to 44°C with 70% humidity causes more deaths under heat-periods. Our results linked heatwaves with climate warming and extreme weather events, aggravated by rapid urbanization, industrialization, deforestation, emission of CO2, degradation of MF, and land-use change. Moreover, findings revealed that there is a significant drop-off in urban greenspaces and growth in built-up areas during 1984-2016. In addition, the SILVA-model projected that MF around the city has the ability to absorb CO2 emission up to 55.4 million tons. SILVA-growth projected that 43.61% CO2 stock can be deposited by MF which contributes 19% of the ecosystem. Model showcase that rehabilitation of 30-mangrove trees per/100m2 possibly reduce the extreme tide of heat stress, tsunami, CO2, and improve the air-quality index of the city. This study provides initial assessment and policy directions to rehabilitate MF to promote sustainable cities and societies. Key Words: CO2, urban green spaces, disaster risk reduction, extreme weather events ID: 3471412

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.