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A place at the table is not enough: Multistakeholder platforms from the perspective of IPLCs

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Creating a global map base of Indigenous Peoples and local community places and people
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The security that the world’s forest-dwelling people have over their collective lands and resources are of increasing importance in the face of global challenges such as climate change, loss of biodiversity and land degradation. As areas occupied by Indigenous Peoples and local communities (IPLC) are increasingly threatened, the need to clarify rights becomes more urgent. Yet, progress is incomplete and held back by a lack of knowledge of where and how IPLCs occupy land. Building on the success of the LandMark initiative to map known IPLC land rights, and Prindex, a joint initiative of Global Land Alliance and ODI to measure perceived tenure security, the next major effort is the development of a global participatory IPLC map and database platform – “map base” – with the transformative potential to map all IPLC rights to land and resources globally. This document details the prospective development of the map base platform and methodology for measuring tenure security. Key advances include the platform’s scalability, focus on community participation, predictive approaches to identifying lands likely under IPLC occupation, and the incorporation of spatially-referenced perceived tenure security data. The result will be a unique and robust platform that will fill key knowledge gaps in the urgent discussions around effective approaches to protecting forest areas and supporting the people who actively manage and depend on these ecosystems. Keywords: Sustainable forest management; Adaptive and integrated management; Monitoring and data collection; Landscape management; Governance ID: 3623235
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    After ten years of readiness, risks, and challenges ahead for implementation of REDD+ in Nepal
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    After a decade of readiness for REDD+, Nepal has signed the Emission Reduction Payment Agreement (ERPA) with the World Bank under the Carbon Fund of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) in February 2021. After signing the agreement, Nepal has entered the implementation phase of the REDD+ and is one of the 15 REDD+ countries to do so until September 2021. When Government of Nepal, decided to participate in the REDD+ initiative in 2010, there was some confusion and reluctance among most of the other stakeholders. The situation slowly changed, and all stakeholders hoped that REDD+ would be beneficial for the country in many aspects. This resulted successful implementation of the 1st phase of readiness and approval of the 2nd phase readiness grant. Nepal’s Emission Reduction Program Document (ER-PD) for the 13 Terai Arc Landscape districts was approved by the Carbon Fund in June 2018. Seven interventions proposed in the ER-PD are being implemented formally for the Emission Reduction program since July 2021. This study critically analyzes the risks and challenges ahead for implementation of the REDD+ in Nepal. The study was based mostly on review of various legal instruments, capacity of government institutions and other stakeholders including indigenous people and local communities (IPLCs) and field level consultations. The study revealed that there are some risks for the REDD+ implementation in coming years. Conflicts between the federal and State governments on rights and authority to manage forest resources and likelihood of policy shift to the traditional management of forest resources instead of production oriented SFM practices envisioned by the ER-PD is a big risk. Private sector is not very enthusiastic to participate in the program as their concerns are not addressed. Furthermore, dominance by the forestry sector may hinder the prospect of active involvement of other sectors such as agriculture. There are also some technical challenges and benefit sharing may also be a very contentious. Keywords: Climate change, REDD+, Forest Carbon, Forest Governance; Benefit sharing ID: 3485323
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    Community-led place-based mangrove ecosystems conservation in West Mexico
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Mangroves are biodiversity- and carbon-rich socio-ecological ecosystems that provide essential goods and services to millions of people. In particular, food, medicine, and wood, which is the primary source of energy and construction material for several Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) living in coastal areas. Mangrove loss and degradation occur at alarming rates putting at risk the traditional livelihoods of IPLCs. Community-led mangrove conservation could be a cost-effective solution to conserve mangrove forests, their ecosystem services, and biological diversity within and beyond protected areas. Although community-based mangrove conservation is a common practice, few successful case studies are known. In West Mexico, IPLCs have been conserving and managing mangrove ecosystems for decades to produce mangrove wood for both domestic and commercial purposes. Through participatory planning, zones have been designated for conservation, wood production, water bodies protection, and restoration. Historical mangrove cover change analysis for the periods 1970/1980, 2005 and 2010 revealed forest expansion within the community-led conserved area (UMA), including in wood production zones. West Mexico is a unique case study that could provide valuable mangrove conservation best practices and lessons learned to other communities around the world. This community-based conservation strategy may contribute to achieving national and international environmental and biodiversity targets by providing multiple socio-ecological and economic benefits from local to global scales if implemented with a rights-based conservation perspective that incorporates multidisciplinary and participatory scientific assessments and traditional knowledge. It could also enhance sustainable local traditional livelihoods and biocultural practices while reducing illegal logging and contributing to mitigating the effects of climate change and biodiversity loss through nature-based solutions. Keywords: Rights-based Conservation; Sustainable Livelihoods; Community-based Decision-making;Mangroves; Community-led Nature-based Solutions ID: 3487429

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