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Towards the Future We Want - End Hunger and make the transition to sustainable agricultural and food systems







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    Towards the Future We Want - End Hunger and make the transition to sustainable agricultural and food systems - Brochure 2012
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    Healthy and productive life depends on food and nutrition security. Yet hundreds of millions of people suffer from hunger and other nutritional deficiencies, and the majority of those people derive their livelihoods from agriculture. We must recognize that the millions of people who manage agricultural systems - from the very poorest to the most commercialized producers constitute the largest group of natural resource managers on earth. Their decisions, as well as those of the world's 7 billio n consumers, are key to global food security and the health of the world's ecosystems. The conditions needed to achieve universal food security and nutrition, responsible environmental stewardship and greater fairness in food management intersect in agricultural and food systems at global, national and local levels. In the face of an expected global population of 9 billion in 2050, pressure on the world's agricultural and food systems will grow. Unless purposeful action is taken, even if the 60 percent increase in food production needed to meet effective demand is achieved, some 300 million people may still remain without adequate access to food. We can no longer ignore the interdependencies between hunger and malnutrition, and natural resources and the environment. We have known since the first Rio summit about the nature of the challenges we face and how to address them. Where we have fallen short is in recognizing and addressing the governance challenges that must be overcome in ord er to take the steps needed to achieve commonly agreed goals. Ultimately, success in eradicating hunger and the transition to sustainable patterns of consumption and production will depend on the decisions of billions of individuals – both producers and consumers. To make sure that proper policies are implemented, fair and effective governance systems are needed – systems that are transparent, participatory, results-focused and accountable.
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    Strengthening Inter-Institutional Coordination Mechanisms to Enhance Food Systems - TCP/INS/3703 2021
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    As a middle income country, Indonesia has made tremendous progress in terms of economic development and poverty reduction income growth has reached over 5 percent per year and the prevalence of undernourishment has drastically declined This pace of economic growth has brought with it inevitable changes, such as urbanization (the urban population increased from 49 8 percent in 2010 to 53 3 percent in 2015 and is projected to reach 60 percent in 2025 and dietary transitions (an increased consumption of processed foods with high salt, fat and sugar content), which continue to affect food security, nutrition and the availability of healthy diets Despite the economic growth and improved welfare, stunting in children under five years of age remains above 30 percent (the World Health Organization’s threshold for very high prevalence) and obesity rose by 75 percent between 1990 and 2013 As a member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations ( and a signatory to the declaration by ASEAN Heads of Government to end all forms of malnutrition, Indonesia recognizes that nutrition is a multisectoral issue and requires a systemwide approach for greater political coherence Moreover, Indonesia can benefit from incorporating the lessons learned in other countries that have undergone a similar economic and dietary transition as it seeks to identify, prioritize and design policies and interventions that deliver transformative changes to support the country’s pursuit of SDG 2 ,,“End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture,” as well as the other SDGs An efficient food systems approach can contribute to ensuring the sufficient supply, good storage, and preservation of food, in addition to the reduction of food loss and waste It can also support the distribution of essential nutrients, especially those that are not consumed in adequate quantities, as opposed to only focusing on calories.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Vers l'avenir que nous voulons - En finir avec la faim et engager la transition vers des systèmes agro-alimentaires durables 2012
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    L'amélioration des systémes agricoles et alimentaires est indispensable pour un monde dans lequel les personnes et les écosystémes seront en meilleure santé. Des vies plus saines et plus productives ne peuvent exister que lorsque tous les étres humains ont, a tout moment, la possibilité physique, sociale et économique de se procurer une nourriture suffisante, saine et nutritive leur permettant de satisfaire leurs besoins énergétiques et préférences alimentaires pour mener une vie saine et activé (FAO, 1996). Des écosystémes sains doivent etre résilients et productifs; ils doivent fournir les biens et les services nécessaires pour répondre aux besoins et aspirations actuels de la société sans compromettre la possibilité, pour les générations futures, de bénéficier de l'éventail complet de biens et de services procurés par les écosystémes terrestres, aquatiques et marins. Des liens trés étroits existent entre les conditions requises pour assurer la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition uni verselles, la gestion responsable de l'environnement, et la gestion plus équitable des produits alimentaires. Ces aspects se recoupent dans les systémes agricoles et alimentaires au niveau mondial, national et local. Afin de les mettre en exergue, la FAO a trois principaux messages à transmettre au Sommet de Rio+20: - La vision du développement durable envisage à Rio ne peut être réalisée qu'en éliminant définitivement la faim et la malnutrition. - La vision de Rio exige que les systémes de consommation et de production alimentaire produisent plus avec moins. - La transition vers un avenir durable impose une modification fondamentale des modes de gouvernance de l'alimentation et de l'agriculture, ainsi q'une répartition équitable des coûts et des avantages qui en d'ecoulent.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Towards the Future We Want - End Hunger and make the transition to sustainable agricultural and food systems - Brochure 2012
    Also available in:

    Healthy and productive life depends on food and nutrition security. Yet hundreds of millions of people suffer from hunger and other nutritional deficiencies, and the majority of those people derive their livelihoods from agriculture. We must recognize that the millions of people who manage agricultural systems - from the very poorest to the most commercialized producers constitute the largest group of natural resource managers on earth. Their decisions, as well as those of the world's 7 billio n consumers, are key to global food security and the health of the world's ecosystems. The conditions needed to achieve universal food security and nutrition, responsible environmental stewardship and greater fairness in food management intersect in agricultural and food systems at global, national and local levels. In the face of an expected global population of 9 billion in 2050, pressure on the world's agricultural and food systems will grow. Unless purposeful action is taken, even if the 60 percent increase in food production needed to meet effective demand is achieved, some 300 million people may still remain without adequate access to food. We can no longer ignore the interdependencies between hunger and malnutrition, and natural resources and the environment. We have known since the first Rio summit about the nature of the challenges we face and how to address them. Where we have fallen short is in recognizing and addressing the governance challenges that must be overcome in ord er to take the steps needed to achieve commonly agreed goals. Ultimately, success in eradicating hunger and the transition to sustainable patterns of consumption and production will depend on the decisions of billions of individuals – both producers and consumers. To make sure that proper policies are implemented, fair and effective governance systems are needed – systems that are transparent, participatory, results-focused and accountable.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Strengthening Inter-Institutional Coordination Mechanisms to Enhance Food Systems - TCP/INS/3703 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    As a middle income country, Indonesia has made tremendous progress in terms of economic development and poverty reduction income growth has reached over 5 percent per year and the prevalence of undernourishment has drastically declined This pace of economic growth has brought with it inevitable changes, such as urbanization (the urban population increased from 49 8 percent in 2010 to 53 3 percent in 2015 and is projected to reach 60 percent in 2025 and dietary transitions (an increased consumption of processed foods with high salt, fat and sugar content), which continue to affect food security, nutrition and the availability of healthy diets Despite the economic growth and improved welfare, stunting in children under five years of age remains above 30 percent (the World Health Organization’s threshold for very high prevalence) and obesity rose by 75 percent between 1990 and 2013 As a member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations ( and a signatory to the declaration by ASEAN Heads of Government to end all forms of malnutrition, Indonesia recognizes that nutrition is a multisectoral issue and requires a systemwide approach for greater political coherence Moreover, Indonesia can benefit from incorporating the lessons learned in other countries that have undergone a similar economic and dietary transition as it seeks to identify, prioritize and design policies and interventions that deliver transformative changes to support the country’s pursuit of SDG 2 ,,“End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture,” as well as the other SDGs An efficient food systems approach can contribute to ensuring the sufficient supply, good storage, and preservation of food, in addition to the reduction of food loss and waste It can also support the distribution of essential nutrients, especially those that are not consumed in adequate quantities, as opposed to only focusing on calories.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Vers l'avenir que nous voulons - En finir avec la faim et engager la transition vers des systèmes agro-alimentaires durables 2012
    Also available in:

    L'amélioration des systémes agricoles et alimentaires est indispensable pour un monde dans lequel les personnes et les écosystémes seront en meilleure santé. Des vies plus saines et plus productives ne peuvent exister que lorsque tous les étres humains ont, a tout moment, la possibilité physique, sociale et économique de se procurer une nourriture suffisante, saine et nutritive leur permettant de satisfaire leurs besoins énergétiques et préférences alimentaires pour mener une vie saine et activé (FAO, 1996). Des écosystémes sains doivent etre résilients et productifs; ils doivent fournir les biens et les services nécessaires pour répondre aux besoins et aspirations actuels de la société sans compromettre la possibilité, pour les générations futures, de bénéficier de l'éventail complet de biens et de services procurés par les écosystémes terrestres, aquatiques et marins. Des liens trés étroits existent entre les conditions requises pour assurer la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition uni verselles, la gestion responsable de l'environnement, et la gestion plus équitable des produits alimentaires. Ces aspects se recoupent dans les systémes agricoles et alimentaires au niveau mondial, national et local. Afin de les mettre en exergue, la FAO a trois principaux messages à transmettre au Sommet de Rio+20: - La vision du développement durable envisage à Rio ne peut être réalisée qu'en éliminant définitivement la faim et la malnutrition. - La vision de Rio exige que les systémes de consommation et de production alimentaire produisent plus avec moins. - La transition vers un avenir durable impose une modification fondamentale des modes de gouvernance de l'alimentation et de l'agriculture, ainsi q'une répartition équitable des coûts et des avantages qui en d'ecoulent.

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