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Preliminary Dynamic Conservation Action Plan: The Cascaded Tank-Village System (CTVS) in the Dry Zone of Sri Lanka

Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) Initiative








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    A proposal for Declaration as a GIAHS: The Cascaded Tank-Village System (CTVS) in the Dry Zone of Sri Lanka
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) Initiative
    2016
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    The Palugaswewa CTVS consists of 11 tanks, of which 5 irrigation tanks are operational and others are abandoned at present. Two tank-villages namely Udakadawala and Palugaswewa are located at the lower part of the cascade. The upper part is covered with dense forest and shrub jungle, where the wildlife is secured. The two village communities are self-sufficient in rice. All food items are produced by the farmers themselves. Well-drained paddy fields are used for cultivation of onion, chili, co rn and pulses during minor season. Legumes, coarse grains, fruits and vegetables are cultivated in uplands and home gardens. These crops bring significant income to the farmers. The tank itself is a basket of food including fish and aquatic food sources. Village commons, forest and the tank ecosystems enhance the bio-diversity. Upstream tree belt (gasgommana) and downstream kattakaduwa of the main tanks, while conserving water, provide wild fruit and food, local medicine and habitat to many pr edators.
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    Siwa Oasis, Egypt. Proposal for Declaration as a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (GIAHS)
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2016
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    This document proposes to recognize and designate Siwa oasis in the northwestern Desert of Egypt as a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Site (GIAHS) under the respective FAO program. Siwa is a globally significant in situ repository of plant genetic resources, especially of uniquely adapted varieties of date palm, olive and secondary crops that are highly esteemed for their quality and continue to play a significant role in rural livelihoods, both for nutrition and income. Situated in a r emote region of the Sahara, and surrounded by breathtaking desert landscapes, Siwa oasis is distinguished by a range of archaeological treasures that testify to the long history of the oasis at the crossroads of ancient trade routes, going back to Pharaonic and Ptolemaic epochs. Its long isolation from outside influences, a population tracing its origin to Berber civilization and speaking an indigenous language, and environmental constraints have given Siwa a unique local culture embodied by its mud-salt brick architecture, peculiar social institutions and a rich heritage of handicrafts. Challenges to oasis agriculture, biodiversity and cultural identity are currently effectively addressed by a number of national and local initiatives, including sustainable agricultural practices, improved irrigation management, the protection of wildlife in and around the oasis as well as sustainable tourism.
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    GIAHS in East Africa – Project Summary
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2012
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    The project titled “Supporting Food Security and Reducing Poverty in Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania through Dynamic Conservation of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (GIAHS)” focuses on two different indigenous agricultural systems, typically found in East Africa: Upland-agro-forestry systems and pastoral systems. Many of these meet the requirements of the GIAHS Initiative: customary use and adaptive management of biological and natural resources compatible with conserva tion and sustainable use requirements, a substantive contribution to local food security and rural development, as well as social and cultural features significant to the cultural diversity and identity of their countries. Additionally, these historic East-African agricultural systems display management practices and biological diversity of great relevance to climate change adaptation and mitigation.

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