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Gender and food loss in sustainable fish value chains in Africa











Randrianantoandro, A., Ward, A. and Safa Barraza, A. 2022. Gender and food loss in sustainable fish value chains in AfricaSustainable Fish Value Chain Development Series No. 1. Rome, FAO. 




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    Book (series)
    A Review of Women's Access to Fish in Small-Scale Fisheries 2015
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    Women play a critical role in every link of the value chain in small-scale fisheries, although their best-known roles are in processing and marketing of fish and other fishery products. This perception of the highly gender-segregated division of labour (men fishing / women processing) has shaped the generalized approach in supporting development initiatives for small-scale fisheries. More often than not, this approach targets men as fishers, and women as processors and marketers of fishery produ cts. However, this generalization has also made fisheries governance blind to women’s other valuable inputs to the sector. In fact, their roles can and should go beyond post-harvest and marketing. However, the lack of utilization of their additional contribution has deterred, for example, women’s participation in fisheries resource management and policy decision-making. The present review aims to move policy attention beyond the generalized, and perhaps limited, perception of women as fish proc essors and marketers and in this way enhance their participation in fisheries resource management and decision-making. The study describes the different ways women have access to fish in small-scale fisheries: as primary users (when they fish by themselves or they finance fishery operations), secondary users (when they access fish through kinship or other close relationships), and tertiary users (when they use capital to buy fish directly from fishers or traders). The review provides case studie s to illustrate some of the issues that tend to keep women in marginalized positions along the value chain. Factors and processes that can contribute to improve women’s participation and decision-making in small-scale fisheries, such as those that challenge conventional approaches based on traditional or “typical” gender roles and obsolete institutional arrangements, are also given. The document also discusses how participation can be improved by raising awareness on gender equality issues along the value chain through applying a gender lens, by providing appropriate support to women’s organizations, including formal recognition of their professional activities, by understanding the socioeconomic context and the particular needs of small-scale fisheries, by giving due attention to power and power relationships, and by taking greater account of the contribution of women in fisheries. As neither women nor men form homogenous groups, the challenge is even greater for women to have access to productive tools and services, which if secured can give them a greater say and control over fisheries resources, thereby increasing their social capital and financial capital. These reflections can be introduced in existing resource management arrangements such as co-management or community-based management, and can probably empower women and improve their participation in fishery resource management decision-making. The reflections in this review can and should be used as guidance and discu ssion material to develop interventions under the Global Assistance Programme in support of the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication.  
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Gender and food loss in sustainable food value chains
    A guiding note
    2018
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    This publication aims to help policy-makers, project designers and field practitioners to conceptualize the nexus between gender equality and food loss while offering practical guidance on and tools for integrating gender concerns into the planning and implementation of food loss studies and reduction strategies and interventions. By linking key concepts from gender-sensitive value chain development and the issue of food loss, it emerges that gender inequalities affect the overall efficiency of the food value chain and generate a poor performance that may cause produce to be removed from the chain. The publication provides critical information and entry points for food loss reduction interventions that improve the way women and men participate in and benefit from food production.
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    Book (series)
    Post-harvest fish loss assessment in small-scale fisheries: A guide for the extension officer 2011
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    Post-harvest fish losses are a major concern and occur in most fish distribution chains throughout the world. Not only do losses constitute lost income to fishers, processors and traders but they also contribute to food insecurity ¿ a loss of fish means less fish available for the consumer. This manual is the result of field testing and validation activities by FAO of three key post-harvest fish loss assessment methodologies developed over the past two decades. Meant as a working tool for extension officers, it describes these methods and provides guidance on when and how they can be used in the process of planning an intervention to reduce post-harvest losses or monitoring and the effectiveness of a loss reduction intervention. This document also provides the information on data communication and the design of loss reduction intervention to give policy-planners and decision-makers a better understanding of issues facing fishing communities.

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