Thumbnail Image

Introduction of early maturing cassava varieties in Bolivia, a cost benefit analysis










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Cost-benefit analysis of cultivating early maturing rice in Lao PDR 2017
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Early maturing rice can be harvested before local rice varieties, thereby reducing the vulnerability of farmers to extreme events and enhancing the resilience of livelihoods. This technology describes the cost-benefit analysis of growing early maturing rice in Lao PDR and provides information on how to grow this rice variety in dry spell and drought areas.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Introduction of livestock refuge mounds, in combination with deworming and preventive vitaminization and mineralization for cattle raising in the Bolivian Amazonia 2017
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This technology describes the introduction of livestock refuge mounds in the sub-Amazonian eco-region of Bolivia (Department of Beni) as a good practice to increase the resilience of cattle raisers to recurrent floods as well as to ensure water availability in the canals during dry spells. Livestock refuge mounds are small mounds covering an area of about 0.5 to 1 ha, and they provide shelter for people, livestock and agricultural products during floods. In addition, animal treatments such as deworming and preventive vitaminization and mineralization were introduced or improved in the targeted communities in order to further reduce animal mortality in both normal and hazard conditions. This technology briefly introduces the concepts of livestock refuge mounds, deworming and preventive vitaminization and mineralization and presents a cost-benefit analysis of the combination of the three good practices compared to normal practices.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Cassava as animal feed in Ghana: past, present and future 2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The study on the use of cassava as animal feed in Ghana was commissioned as part of FAO’s initiative supporting poverty reduction in northern part of the country. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is one of the main staple food crops grown by almost all farming families in Ghana, contributing to large proportion of daily calorie intake of the population. It is used to prepare fufu, the local popular dish, and considered as the poor man’s food. Ghana is the fourth largest cassava grower in Africa, afte r Nigeria, Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola. In 2010, Ghana produced 13.5 million tons of cassava. Available information suggests that, cassava is cultivated by over 90 percent of the farming population and contributes to 22 percent to the agricultural GDP, making it the right target for the fight against poverty in the country. The multi-purpose use of cassava as food for humans and animals, making various industrial products, including its use as input for breweries, attracted many pr ojects and programmes working on its value chain in Ghana. These projects, particularly the IFAD funded Root and Tuber Improvement Programme, introduced improved varieties for better yield, reduced post-harvest losses, improved agro-processing and better access to markets, etc. The various interventions enhanced production and marketing of cassava in the country improving income of producers and other actors involved in the value chain and generating more employment for women and youth, contribu ting in this way to poverty reduction. FAO, with its comparative advantage of promoting agricultural and food production and rural development, is supporting poverty reduction initiatives in Ghana. In particular, FAO through its Strategic Objective three is implementing an initiative targeting reduction of rural poverty in Northern Ghana.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.