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Mutual Benefits through the cultivation of swamp jelutung (Dyera polyphylla): Preventing peatland degradation and creating income by an endemic latex producing Tree of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Brunei and Malaysia)










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Cultivation of Dyera Polyphylla (Swamp Jelutung)
    Tanjung Jabung Timur District, Indonesia(1º20’S, 104º05’E)
    2015
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    Swamp jelutung is a member of the periwinkle family (Apocynaceae) and largely restricted to peatlands of Sumatra and Borneo. It is a large tree that can attain a reach heights of 50–60 m. The trees produce a fine, light wood used for carving and pencils, and a latex that is used for a variety of purposes, including chewing gum, dentistry and insulation material. Due to over–harvesting and the loss of peat swamp forest habitat, the species is listed as vulnerable by the International Union for C onservation of Nature (IUCN).
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    Jelutung (Dyera polyphylla) agroforestry on drained peatlands 2016
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    Dyera polyphylla, which is locally known as jelutung, is a tree that produces latex. The latex is used for chewing gums, insulator, tube, and others. The wood is soft and bright colour, which can be used for pulp, plywood, pencil, wooden toy, and others. It naturally grows on peat swamp forests in Sumatra and Kalimantan (Indonesian part of Borneo). Along with fast deforestation, population of wild jelutung is decreasing. In the era of degraded peatland restoration, jelutung was promoted to be pl anted in reforestation and afforestation. Enrichment planting with jelutung in the existing tree crops would increase biomass and carbon sequestration. Farmers will get additional income from the latex of jelutung and cash crops (such as galangal dan ginger). Farmers would protect their land and farms from fir. To sum up, community collaboration is important on peatland management, as they are integral part of the landscape.
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    Restoration of Lands after Fuel Peat Extraction
    Kihniö Aitoneva, Finland (lat 62º12'N, long 23º18'E)
    2015
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    More than half of the total peatland area of Belarus (over 1.5 million ha) has been drained for agriculture, forestry, and peat extraction. Out of this area, 122 200 ha are cutover peatlands that have been abandoned after peat excavation and 36 800 ha are still being exploited. During the last few years, about 50 000 ha of drained peatlands have been rewetted. Currently, another 500 000 ha are potentially available for hydrological restoration.

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