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FAO/GIEWS - Special Alert No. 336












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    Newsletter
    FAO/GIEWS Special Alert No. 337 - East Africa, 20 December 2016
    Alarming food insecurity in several areas of East Africadue to severe drought
    2016
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    Widespread drought severely affects crops and rangelands in East Africa and food insecurity is expected to significantly deteriorate by early 2017 Major areas of concern are central and southern Somalia, South-Eastern Ethiopia, northern and eastern Kenya, northern and eastern United Republic of Tanzania and South-Eastern Uganda Sharply increasing prices of cereals and livestock products constrain food access for large numbers of households Recurrent climatic shocks have undermined household resi lience and urgent support to agriculture is needed.
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    Newsletter
    FAO/GIEWS Special Alert No. 339 2017
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    Prevailing severe dry weather conditions, virtually since October 2016, have affected rangelands and crops in large parts of East Africa, causing a serious deterioration of food security conditions in the subregion. Major areas of concern are central and southern Somalia, southeastern Ethiopia, northern and eastern Kenya, northern United Republic of Tanzania, and northeastern and southwestern Uganda. Localized Fall armyworm infestations are likely to further affect yields in the affected areas. Soaring prices of cereals are limiting food access for large numbers of poor households. The purchasing power of pastoral households in Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia is severely constrained by plunging prices of livestock and rising prices of cereals. Recurrent climatic shocks have undermined household resilience. Urgent support to agricultural livelihoods is critically needed.
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    FAO/GIEWS - Special Alert No. 338 2017
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    Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) poses a great threat to the tilapia sector. Tilapias are farmed globally and are the second most important aquaculture species in terms of volumes produced, providing a key source of affordable animal protein, income to fishfarmers and fishers, and domestic and export earnings. TiLV has been confirmed in some countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It is likely that TiLV may have a wider distribution than is known today and its threat to tilapia farming at the gl obal level is significant. While there is no public health concern for this pathogen, there is a significant risk of TiLV being translocated both inter- and intra-continentally through the movement of infected live tilapias in the absence of appropriate biosecurity measures. Tilapia producing countries need to be vigilant and take appropriate risk management measures (e.g. enhanced diagnostic testing of imported stocks and unexplained tilapia mortalities and reporting to biosecurity authoriti es, active surveillance, public information campaigns and contingency plans) to reduce the further spread and potential socio-economic impacts of this emerging disease.

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