Thumbnail Image

The White/Wiphala Paper on Indigenous Peoples' food systems










FAO. 2021. The White/Wiphala Paper on Indigenous Peoples’ food systems. Rome.




Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    The right to food guidelines and indigenous peoples:an operational guide 2009
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This Guide aims to assist indigenous peoples and their organizations on how to use the Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food in the Context of National Food Security1 (hereafter “Right to Food Guidelines” or “Guidelines”) to promote their own interests in the area of food security. It also intends to increase awareness and improve understanding among development workers as well as United Nations (UN) staff, government official s and indigenous peoples themselves, of linkages between issues affecting indigenous peoples and the Right to Food Guidelines.2 The Guide is thus mainly about using the Right to Food Guidelines as an instrument to advocate and lobby in favor of indigenous peoples’ interests. The Right to Food Guidelines were adopted unanimously by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Council in 2004. They represent an action plan, reflecting a consensus among FA O members on what needs to be done in relevant policy areas to promote food security through a human rights-based approach. The Right to Food Guidelines provide guidance on areas and types of actions the state should take in order to meet its obligations under the right to food, and at the same time indicate ways for indigenous peoples to be more active to work towards realizing their right to food.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Project Document for Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania. GCP/GLO/198/GER - Supporting Food Security and Reducing Poverty in Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania through Dynamic Conservation of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (G
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2008
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This project is the Sub-Sahara Africa component of the FAO global initiative on conservation and adaptive management of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS). Two specific transboundary systems and their population will be targeted: Masaai pastoral system and upland agro-forestry systems. The “dynamic conservation” approach which the project is advocating will address adaptive management and conservation of productive landscape of Masaai and Upland communities and will build capacity of local communities in Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania as a mean to achieve sustainable agriculture and rural development (SARD). It is expected that the project will also contribute to sustainable development through: (i) enhancing the benefits derived by local populations and indigenous peoples from the management, conservation and sustainable use of agricultural biodiversity and natural resources; (ii) adding economic value and sharing derived benefits from these systems; (iii) enhancing food security and alleviating poverty while maintaining ecosystem goods and services of traditional agricultural systems (iv) improving awareness and education among government agencies, local authorities and communities, and other stake holders; ( iv) d emonstrating “local livelihood benefits – global environmental benefits linkages” through agro-ecosystem a pproaches across government agencies, local communities, indigenous peoples and private sector; (v) g uarantee that the ri ght to adequate food is realized by ensuring that every man, woman and child, in the t arget communities, have the physical and economic access at all times to adequate food or means for its procurement; and (vi) disseminating key best practices and lessons learnt between implementing agencies, recipient communities and countries -locally, regionally and on a global scale.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Sustainable Development Goal 16 & Indigenous Peoples’ Collective Rights to Land, Territories & Resources 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Land rights are interlinked with peace and development, being the trigger for conflict and disputes involving Indigenous Peoples’ rights in almost every region in the world (United Nations Indigenous Peoples Major Group for Sustainable Development, 2019). Access to land is closely related to the right to adequate food, as recognized under article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and article 11 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Natural resources are the main direct source of food for the majority of Indigenous Peoples. While land and water are central to food production, forest resources provide a basis for subsistence harvesting as well as for income-generating activities, e.g. through the collection and use of non-wood forest products. Thus Indigenous Peoples’ right to food often depends closely on their access to and control over their lands and other natural resources in their territories. For many traditional communities, especially those living in remote regions, access to hunting, fishing and gathering grounds for their subsistence livelihoods is essential for ensuring their adequate nutrition, as they may have no physical or economic access to marketed food (Knuth, 2009). There is therefore a key relationship between realising the right to food and improving access to natural resources which is also recognised by the Voluntary Guidelines to support the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of national food security (Right to Food Guidelines) adopted by FAO Council in 2004. This paper has highlights the intrinsic relationship that exists between the collective of Indigenous Peoples to land, territories and resources, and SDG 16 on peace justice and strong institutions. In the light of the goals set out in the 2030 Agenda, the fulfillment of the entire SDGs for Indigenous Peoples depends on the legal recognition and legal protection of their collective rights as an essential condition for the implementation of the right to self-determination as enshrined in UNDRIP and the other international treaties. The legal protection of collective rights of Indigenous Peoples implies not only respecting their collective right to natural resources which is at the core of FAO’s mandate, but also their right to exercise their justice and governance systems. Respect for their institutions, legal regimes, and customary law within the framework of legal pluralism is an intrinsic part of SDG16, and the achievement of peace depends precisely on this.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.