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The impact of HIV/AIDS on farmers knowledge of seed Case study of Chokwa District, Gaza Province, Mozambique

Case study of Chokwa District, Gaza Province, Mozambique







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    Gender differences in assets 2011
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    Agriculture can be an important engine of growth and poverty reduction. But the sector is underperforming in many countries in part because women, who are often a crucial resource in agriculture and the rural economy, face constraints that reduce their productivity. In this paper we document the gender gap in access to and ownership of most inputs, asset and services important for agricultural activities. We focus in particular on education, land, livestock, financial services, modern inputs, in formation and extension and labour. Across assets and inputs women are disadvantaged. The gap in education has narrowed over the last decades but substantial gaps remain in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. For land, the key farm household asset, there are significant gender differences in access to land across regions. Moreover female-headed households also typically operate smaller land holdings than male-headed households, across regions. There are also significant and systematic gender diff erences with regard to livestock, financial services, modern inputs, information and extension and labour. Gender differences in assets are generally interlinked, for example when female farmers have lower levels of technology this is due to their having less access to land, less access to labour and less access to extension services, not their sex. This also helps explain why women farmers do not necessarily benefit from access to extension services, as some studies have found. The implication of this is that selective interventions are unlikely to be effective.
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    Participatory rural appraisal- Vulnerability study of Ayeyarwady Delta fishing communities in Myanmar and social protection opportunities 2019
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    The Participatory Rural Appraisal: Vulnerability Study of Ayeyarwady Delta Fishing Communities in Myanmar and Their Social Protection Opportunities (PRA-V study) seeks to inform fisheries management and social protection processes of the key vulnerability issues faced by fishers at the five pilot sites selected for fisheries co-management. An analysis of the PRA-V study information leads to some broad conclusions. The PRA-V study suggests that the most vulnerable communities are in Maubin and Hinthada. In both areas, community fisheries co-management is unlikely enough to reduce household or individual vulnerability significantly. The communities in Thabaung, Labutta and Dedaye appear to offer more livelihood opportunities for local people. In these areas, improving fishing ground access would likely have a positive effect on the overall livelihoods of people. However, the remoteness of the two coastal areas could prohibit social and economic development. The PRA-V study also explored gender vulnerability aspects, focusing on female-headed households and individual women from fisher households. Due to the patriarchal social structure and cultural norms, many female-headed households appear to be more vulnerable than male-headed households. The PRA-V study suggests that there is gender disparity in terms of vulnerability in many communities. Recommendations for further Ayeyarwady fisheries law reforms, fisheries management and social protection interventions that would reduce fisher household vulnerability are included in the discussion section.
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    Strengthening Institutional Capacity in Mitigating HIV/AIDS Impact on the Agricultural Sector
    Potential Mitigation Interventions
    2004
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    The Government of Zambia, through the Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives (MACO), has requested FAO Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) assistance in awareness raising and capacity building of senior agriculture staff in the Ministry for addressing HIV/AIDS concerns and mitigating the negative impact of HIV/AIDS on agricultural production and household food security. Given the cross-cutting nature of HIV/AIDS, it is important to identify possible interventions that are within the manda te of MACO. Therefore, this document will outline an Integrated Framework for Mitigation that would guide future action by MACO. The mitigation framework has been developed on a pilot basis for Choma district, Southern Province and started with a stakeholders’ workshop in Choma. The output of the workshop were the following proposed mitigation strategies i) promote labour saving practices; ii) promote low labour- low risk commercial agro businesses; iii) enhance food security and nutrition amo ng HIV/AIDS affected households; iv) support orphans and vulnerable children; and v) promote appropriate extension messages to vulnerable households. Based on these identified thematic areas, participatory planning workshops were organised in four communities. Data was collected from individuals and households–selected according to four household types: female headed households with orphans, male headed households with orphans, female headed households with people living with HIV/AIDS, and male headed household with people living HIV/AIDS.

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