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Fifteen years implementing the Right to Food Guidelines – Summary

Reviewing progress to achieve the 2030 Agenda









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Fifteen years implementing the Right to Food Guidelines
    Reviewing progress to achieve the 2030 Agenda
    2019
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    The Right to Food Guidelines provide practical guidance on ways to implement the right to adequate food in a wide range of policy and programmes areas through a human rights-based approach. Since the adoption of the Right to Food Guidelines, FAO and its partners have produced a wealth of tools, strengthened capacity, and facilitated multi-stakeholder dialogues worldwide. But the goal of realizing the right to food of everyone is not accomplished yet- over 820 million people are currently suffering from chronic hunger. This fifteen-Year Retrospective on the Right to Food Guidelines helps us look back and understand what has worked and why, where the bottlenecks lie, and how governments and their partners can be most effective in the fight against hunger and malnutrition.
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    Document
    Sustainable Development Goal 16 & Indigenous Peoples’ Collective Rights to Land, Territories & Resources 2021
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    Land rights are interlinked with peace and development, being the trigger for conflict and disputes involving Indigenous Peoples’ rights in almost every region in the world (United Nations Indigenous Peoples Major Group for Sustainable Development, 2019). Access to land is closely related to the right to adequate food, as recognized under article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and article 11 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Natural resources are the main direct source of food for the majority of Indigenous Peoples. While land and water are central to food production, forest resources provide a basis for subsistence harvesting as well as for income-generating activities, e.g. through the collection and use of non-wood forest products. Thus Indigenous Peoples’ right to food often depends closely on their access to and control over their lands and other natural resources in their territories. For many traditional communities, especially those living in remote regions, access to hunting, fishing and gathering grounds for their subsistence livelihoods is essential for ensuring their adequate nutrition, as they may have no physical or economic access to marketed food (Knuth, 2009). There is therefore a key relationship between realising the right to food and improving access to natural resources which is also recognised by the Voluntary Guidelines to support the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of national food security (Right to Food Guidelines) adopted by FAO Council in 2004. This paper has highlights the intrinsic relationship that exists between the collective of Indigenous Peoples to land, territories and resources, and SDG 16 on peace justice and strong institutions. In the light of the goals set out in the 2030 Agenda, the fulfillment of the entire SDGs for Indigenous Peoples depends on the legal recognition and legal protection of their collective rights as an essential condition for the implementation of the right to self-determination as enshrined in UNDRIP and the other international treaties. The legal protection of collective rights of Indigenous Peoples implies not only respecting their collective right to natural resources which is at the core of FAO’s mandate, but also their right to exercise their justice and governance systems. Respect for their institutions, legal regimes, and customary law within the framework of legal pluralism is an intrinsic part of SDG16, and the achievement of peace depends precisely on this.
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    Book (series)
    Legal developments and progressive realization of the right to adequate food
    Right to Food Thematic Study 3
    2014
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    Legal developments in the progressive realization of the right to adequate food thematic study explores the significant legal advances of the right to food since the adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines to support the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of national food security (Right to Food Guidelines) in 2004. While not legally binding as such, the Right to Food Guidelines, particularly Guideline 7, provide guidance on strengthening legal frameworks for the p rogressive realization of the right to food. The study examines the explicit and implicit recognition of the right to food in national constitutions. While these are highly significant and can provide grounds for litigation, constitutional provisions alone do not provide precise instructions on the different issues that are relevant to the right to food. Adoption of framework laws or specific food security legislation can establish an institutional structure and develop further what action shou ld be taken and how decision-making processes are organized. Sectoral legislation is also necessary to regulate public and private actors in the different fields, as illustrated in the study. With the overview of the various developments at the legislative level, the study proceeds to examine judicial developments related to the right to food. Through the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights the right has become justiciable at the international level and as a matter of international law. There have also been notable jurisprudential developments on the right to food in recent years. The study cites court cases from a number of different countries with different legal systems, as well as cases from regional human rights instances. The cases cited illustrate how the right to food has been interpreted and how it can be enforced.

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