Thumbnail Image

Mainstreaming youth in FAO's Work Programme










FAO. 2022. Mainstreaming youth in FAO's Work Programme. Rome.



Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    The youth barometer: Implementation of the youth target in FAO and globally
    Biennium 2022–2023
    2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    A central principle of the 2030 Agenda is the assurance that “no one will be left behind” and the universal nature of the 2030 Agenda entails that youth should be considered across all goals and targets. In its Strategic Framework 2022–2031, FAO has identified “youth” as an important group whose needs must be addressed across all of FAO’s programmatic work areas to promote a more systematic mainstreaming and operationalization of these issues across all of FAO’s work. This booklet provides in-depth analysis on the trends of the youth-specific key performance indicator in FAO over the biennium 2022–2023. Further analyses included are on youth inclusion in projects affiliated to FAO’s Programme Priority Areas, Country Programming Frameworks, and at global level, FAO’s performance in the implementation of Youth2030 – The UN Youth Strategy.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    FAO in Europe and Central Asia 2023 2024
    Also available in:

    FAO’s work globally and in the Europe and Central Asia region is guided by the FAO Strategic Framework 2022–2031, which articulates the Organization’s vision of a sustainable and food-secure world for all. The Strategic Framework seeks to support the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development through the transformation to more efficient, inclusive, resilient and sustainable agrifood systems for better production, better nutrition, a better environment and a better life, leaving no one behind. With the Strategic Framework and the four betters as a lens, this report reviews and describes the project and the programme work of the Organization at the regional level and in each of the FAO programme countries of the region. For the Europe and Central Asia region, the year 2023 was marked by the tests of war, conflicts and natural disasters. The year began with the 6 February earthquake in Türkiye and Syria – the most severe to occur in Türkiye in a century – that directly affected an estimated 9.1 million people in the 11 hardest-hit provinces, and caused great loss of life. Additionally, the war in Ukraine continued to disrupt domestic, regional and world food markets and displace great numbers of people. The region also experienced extreme weather events. This report summarizes FAO’s achievements and accomplishments in Europe and Central Asia in 2023, including work to increase social protection, ensure climate action, improve conditions for youth and women and implement solutions based on science, innovation and digitalization. The first section of this report interprets FAO’s work in countries and regionally through the lens of the four betters, while the second summarizes the work completed in each country in 2023 and outlines ongoing efforts.The report captures snapshots of FAO's work in the Europe and Central Asia region. Short entries cover such topics as FAO's work on agrifood systems transformation, the digital and green transformation of agriculture to increase sustainable resilience, land banking and consolidation, the Digital Villages Initiative, Farmer Field Schools, precision agriculture, the One Health approach, fish health management, the One Country One Priority Product initiative, reduction of food loss and waste, women's empowerment and gender equity, youth empowerment, the Hand-in-Hand Initative, food systems controls, climate change action, mainstreaming biodiversity, the regional seed programme, management of agrichemicals, an overview of the fruit and vegetable sector of the Eurasian Economic Union, Agricultural Market Information and strengthening agrifood policy and market developments and resource mobililization.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Evaluation of FAO’s country programme in Sierra Leone 2012–2019 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The agriculture sector in Sierra Leone accounts for 60 percent of GDP and 58 percent of total employment. More than 58 percent of the country’s population live in rural areas and 86.1 percent of this population are engaged in smallholder subsistence agricultural production. Ten years of civil conflict and the Ebola epidemic in 2014 negatively affected food security and the country’s overall socio-economic situation. The country is particularly vulnerable to extreme events such as food chain crises and natural hazards which have a direct impact on food security and livelihoods. This evaluation aims to identify lessons learned and provide strategic recommendations on how FAO programmes can be better oriented in Sierra Leone. FAO’s overall contribution to developmental challenges was assessed in the priority areas defined in the CPFs covering 2012–16 and 2017–19. The evaluation comprised an examination of associated outcome areas related to support to smallholder commercialization, natural resources management, and effective response to disasters and increasing social productivity and resilience. The review also evaluated crosscutting issues, including gender equality and women’s empowerment, climate resilience, nutrition, capacity development and youth employment. The evaluation used different methods to collect the views of the beneficiaries and other stakeholders, such as structured focus group discussions, structured key informant interviews, direct observation, and workshops. The fieldwork took place with actors from projects across five districts: Bo, Bombali, Kenema, Kono, and Port Loko. The evaluation found evidence of significant and sustainable results in a range of areas of FAO’s activities, including policy-related work, from adoption of legislation to policy influence, piloting of approaches, and standards and regulatory frameworks. Likewise, results leading to livelihoods improvements, empowerment and adoption of more sustainable organizational practices, technologies and skills were found. Nevertheless, the programme failed to aggregate activities and interventions in a programmatic and coherent portfolio. FAOs capacity to deliver sustainable and consistent results, with strong partnerships and complementary action, was often undermined by lack of, or weak systems and functions. FAO should use the development of the new CPF as a way to re-design its strategic footprint in the country and reach its full potential, despite the limiting factors. To do this, FAO could consider adopting an area-based approach, implementing a programmatic, multi-stakeholder and cross sectoral adaptive approach based on regions/districts.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.