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Rural social protection 101

The what and how of rural development and resilience










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    Book (stand-alone)
    The State of Food and Agriculture 2015 (SOFA): Social Protection and Agriculture: Breaking the Cycle of Rural Poverty 2015
    Despite significant progress in meeting the Millennium Development Goals on poverty and hunger, almost a billion people still live in extreme poverty (less than $1.25 per person per day) and 795 million still suffer from chronic hunger. Much more will have to be done to achieve the new Sustainable Development Goals on eradicating poverty and hunger by 2030. Most of the extreme poor live in rural areas of developing countries and depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. They are so poor and m alnourished that their families live in a cycle of poverty that passes from generation to generation. Many developing countries are adopting a successful new strategy for breaking the cycle of rural poverty – combining social protection and agricultural development. Social protection measures such as cash benefits for widows and orphans and guaranteed public works employment for the poor can protect vulnerable people from the worst deprivation. It can allow households to increase and diversify t heir diets. It can also help them save and invest on their own farms and or start new businesses. Agricultural development programmes that support small family farms in accessing markets and managing risks can create employment opportunities that make these families more self-reliant and resilient. Social protection and agricultural development, working together, can break the cycle of rural poverty.
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    Project
    Strengthening Coherence Between Social Protection and Agriculture to Combat Food Insecurity and Rural Poverty - MTF/GLO/937/ULA 2021
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    Poverty, hunger and food insecurity are most heavily concentrated among rural dwellers. To address these problems, in recent years, countries have set up a number of social assistance programmes to help extreme poor households manage risk more effectively and protect their consumption and assets without having to resort to negative coping strategies in the face of a crisis. Cash transfers and other programmes have been implemented at scale; and it has been demonstrated that these programmes make a positive difference in the lives of the rural poor. At the same time, it has become increasingly evident that despite their positive contributions to shielding the poor from shocks and helping them avert destitution, social protection programmes by themselves are insufficient to fully unleash productive potential and help small farm and other poor rural households embark on self-sustaining livelihood pathways out of poverty. In the light of these issues, the project aimed to explore and document the benefits of articulating social protection and rural development interventions, in order to provide evidence to policy-makers and donors on better programme design, sequencing, and institutional design for supporting rural poor alleviation.
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    Poster, banner
    Combater a pobreza e a fome conciliando agricultura e proteção social 2018
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    This visual graphic aims at highlighting the main messages from the publication “Strengthening coherence between agriculture and social protection – Framework for Analysis and Action”. Why social protection is important, how agriculture and social protection complement and mutually reinforce each other, what are some examples of well-coordinated agriculture and social protection interventions, and what more can be done to make the two sectors work together to combat hunger and poverty. Despite recent progress, still today 1 billion people are poor and 800 million people are hungry. Extreme poverty is concentrated in rural areas, and the rural poor largely rely on agriculture especially in sub-Saharan Africa where as much as 66% of the income of poor small family farmers comes from agriculture. Combating hunger and poverty involves increasing production and diversification among small family farmers as well as increasing and stabilizing domestic food production. Well-coordinated agricultural and social protection programmes can help poor small family farmers in breaking-out of the cycle of poverty and hunger.

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