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The role of bamboo forest in balancing and sustaining the development of local livelihood and human well-being in rural areas of Vietnam

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Capacity building model for developing bamboo industry in Indonesia: A shared learning platform for multi-stakeholder partnerships
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Bamboo in Indonesia is one of the non-timber forest products (NTFPs) that has not yet been used and developed effectively. Its utilization still limited within traditional uses in the form of home industries or small scale enterprises. In the other hand the evidences from other countries show that modern methods to utilize bamboo at the industrial scale have improved its values and raise benefits in rural communities. This study in 2014 to 2017 employed approaches of participatory action research and multi-stakeholder analysis to 1) improve the management of bamboo for sustainable uses and for the benefits of rural communities; and 2) enhance stakeholders’ capacity in developing the bamboo industry in Indonesia. The participatory actions research were conducted with the community groups in Bangli and Ngada Regency (Bali and East Nusa Tenggara Province, respectively) by developing models on bamboo utilization started at rural level. Stakeholder analysis and several consultative meetings to address the key problems were conducted at Regencys, regencies and provincial levels; and at the national level to promote the national policy on sustainable bamboo utilization. This program campaign namely “a thousand bamboo villages” became the platform for community-based bamboo industries in Indonesia. These collaborative actions were beneficial for local communities and have unified multi stakeholders’ vision to build a sustainable bamboo industry. This study provides lessons learnt of: (i) the process on how to establish an integrated model of community-based bamboo industry; (ii) the strategy to build a collaborative network on “a thousand bamboo villages” movement; (iii) the community-based approach and stakeholder capacity building for bamboo utilization and people, public, and private partnership of the bamboo industry in Indonesia. Keywords: bamboo, NTFPs, multi stake holders, partnership, community, framework ID: 3486278
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    Use of traditional knowledge in sustainable forest management and provisioning of ecosystem services in Jharkhand, India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Before Scientific knowledge on forest management, local and indigenous communities living in and around forests managed forest and associated landscapes managed forests in such a way which conserved forests and ecosystem, sustained their livelihood and culture. The tribals and other rural people residing in and around forest areas of Jharkhand, an eastern state of India, have their own traditional knowledge (TK) which they acquired by experience during sustainable use of natural resources. Hence such knowledge has the potential value for sustainable forest management, biodiversity conservation and provisioning of Ecosystem services. Traditional Knowledge encompasses a profound belief system associated with ecosystem, livelihoods, ethno medicinal practices, use of natural resources etc. and pass from generation to generation through legends, folk stories, folk songs etc. A study was carried out to know trajectories of SFM development and the role of the TK for SFM in Jharkhand, India. The study reflects that these TK are associated with practices like conservation through Sacred Grove, celebrating festivals based on the nature, taboos, social belief and various other practices which have been helpful in SFM. But in the contemporary globalization and commercialization, there is risk of erosion of such TK. Hence their documentation is necessary. Documentation of data related to traditional use of medicinal plants and other NTFPs like Lac, Silk, and Bamboo etc. for livelihood were done involving three major steps. These are – identification of medicinal plants and other NTFPs used for livelihood and other purposes, documentation of traditional uses and traditional knowledge associated with these NTFPs, and finally exploring how TK and scientific knowledge can be harmonized for SFM. Government policy in India and Jharkhand in this regard has brought about radical changes. With the adoption of Resolution related to Join Forest Management, enactment of Forest Right Act 2006, and implementing Forest Working plan Code 2014 by Government, there has been a perceptible change in approach towards assimilation of TK in SFM. The paper also presents how such knowledge and practices can be helpful in provisioning of ecosystem services. Keywords: Ecosystem services, Jharkhand, SFM, TK ID: 3476942
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    Modified Taungya plantation as a rural development initiative to restore landscapes and enhance livelihoods in Ghana
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    In Ghana, forest plantations have been adopted as one of the best options for restoring degraded landscapes and providing economic benefits to tree growers and forest fringe communities. From 2002 to 2020, approximately 200,000 hectares of forest plantations have been established across the country. Although a mixture of exotic and indigenous forest tree species are used, approximately 70% of forest plantations is Teak (Tectona grandis) and reasons for its selection include the following a) Fast growth and good economic returns, b) Relatively fire resistant, c) Poles from thinning used for electricity transmission d) Landscape restoration using local partnerships e) NTFPs survive under shade after canopy closure, f) Medicinal uses of the leaves among others. Although the government is playing a lead role in the establishment of these forest plantations, public-private and public-community partnerships have been used in addition to purely private investments. The main public-community partnership for forest plantation development since 2002 has been the Modified Taungya System (MTS), which is a collaboration between government, represented by the Forestry Commission and forest-fringe communities with equal benefit sharing. MTS allows the communities to participate in the restoration of degraded landscapes whilst benefiting from food crops, income from tree seedling sales, and ultimately 40% of the Standing Timber Value from commercial thinning and final harvest. This paper highlights modalities for MTS as a unique management model for community development, promoting forest-based livelihoods, improving household incomes, enhancing food security and landscape restoration. The challenges and opportunities for maximizing benefits from the system towards development of rural economies will be discussed. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Sustainable forest management, Partnerships, Human health and well-being, Economic Development ID: 3624103

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