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Celebrating 40 Years in Sri Lanka










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    Document
    Sri Lanka and FAO: Achievements and Success Stories 2011
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    Upon achieving independence from the United Kingdom, the country of Ceylon became a member nation of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in 1948 and development support to Ceylon’s agriculture and livestock sectors dates back to 1953. With UNDP support, FAO was actively involved in providing technical assistance to the country which was renamed “Sri Lanka” in 1972. In 1979, a full FAO Representation was established within the UN compound in Colombo. As UNDP support for FAO executed projects diminished in 1990, FAO has continued an active supporting role through trust fund arrangements and with the Technical Cooperation Programme to address government needs and priorities within the sectors of agriculture, animal husbandry, fisheries and forestry. Since 1979, some 350 projects and programmes have been implemented with FAO support amounting to nearly 300 million USD, while many thousands of Sri Lankans have benefited from training in-country and abroad and m any have been supported to participate in international conferences around the world. The government and the people of Sri Lanka have significantly benefited from the technical expertise and support provided by FAO over the past half a century. Consequently FAO has a high degree of respect within the country and the government has displayed a considerable level of trust for FAO as the Representation was requested in 2010 to take a lead for agricultural livelihood reestablishment for conflict dis placed people in the north including full provision of seed paddy for the current planting season. As the 26 year-long conflict with the Tamil Tigers ended in 2009, a new planning exercise is now underway between the government and FAO to prioritize needs within each mandated sector for the next five years. FAO maintain constant and regular contact with government officials and has close partnerships with the UN Country Team and donors to assist the government to address their stated needs and p riorities within FAO’s mandated areas. Toward this end, FAO co-chairs the sector working group on agriculture and food security with WFP, and is currently also responsible for the coordination of agriculture rehabilitation in the north. Finally, FAO chairs the poverty pillar of the UNDAF which encompasses FAO’s mandated sectors. Looking ahead, FAO’s programmes in Sri Lanka will continue to expand in 2011 and beyond, with some 100 staff at present based in 10 different locations.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Celebrating 40 Years of Country Representations in Asia and the Pacific 2018
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    The formal establishment of FAO offices in countries of Asia and the Pacific began in 1977 – a legacy of Edouard Saouma, who served as FAO Director-General from 1976 to 1993. Saouma’s vision was a Food and Agriculture Organization that was working on the ground, side by side with the Organization’s constituents to better help them fight hunger and poverty and to do so concretely and demonstrably. He achieved this goal by agreeing with governments to post FAO Representatives in their countries and open official FAO Representation Offices there. Prior to this, and since its inception, FAO had been represented by Senior Agricultural Advisers – intermediates – based within UNDP country offices. The test case for the new model was Lebanon. In 1977 the first FAO Representation office was opened there. Within the year, the Asia-Pacific region established five country offices in quick succession. Bangladesh and Nepal were established in February, India in March, followed by Myanmar (then known as Burma) in October and the Philippines in November. By the end of the decade, a further five country offices were created in Viet Nam, Pakistan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Indonesia in 1978, in that order, and they were joined by Sri Lanka in 1979. Forty years after the first country Representation offices opened, FAO’s commitment and determination to work in partnership to help its member nations achieve zero hunger and food security, in an environmentally tenable and sustainable way, while improving rural livelihoods, is as strong as ever. This brochure formally acknowledges and celebrates these partnerships and their achievements so far.
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    Booklet
    Celebrating 40 years in Indonesia
    Celebrating a 70-year partnership and 40-years of in-country Representation
    2018
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    After seven decades of fruitful collaboration, the work of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today is more than ever aligned with the priorities of host governments in meeting the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 through localized action. As a specialized agency in food and agriculture, and with its feet firmly on the ground, FAO implements programmes and projects in cooperation with its members and partners to achieve the shared goal of #ZeroHunger and all of the other SDGs by 2030. While FAO had previously provided technical support to member countries without having a permanent presence on the ground, the 1977 opening of the first country Representation in Lebanon marked the beginning of FAO’s long-term field presence at national level. In Indonesia, the Minister of Foreign Affairs on behalf of the Government of Indonesia, signed the Memorandum of Understanding on the establishment of the FAO Representation in Indonesia just one year later with the Director General of FAO in October 1978. Hence, our celebration today, marking the 40th year, after which FAO established a permanent presence in Indonesia. Close collaboration between FAO and the Indonesian Government across the food and agricultural sectors, including in fisheries and forestry, has strengthened over the decades, and has resulted in a long term trust and friendship between FAO and many government departments and agencies, as well as non-governmental actors in development. As of today, over 650 projects and programs have been implemented by FAO throughout Indonesia with the assistance of more than 1600 experts and consultants (both national and international). Given still significant levels of rural poverty, malnutrition and rapid urbanization, Indonesia’s challenge is to make agriculture, fisheries and forestry more profitable, while also making these sectors more resilient to the effects of climate change to feed future generations. It is FAO’s ambition to work with key line Ministries to demonstrate good practice through targeted interventions, which can then be scaled up with Government’s own human and financial resources, while also contributing at the policy level to help redirect investment to where it will have a more positive impact on achieving greater food and nutrition security.

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