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Doing business in the time of COVID-19

Prevention guidelines and recommendations for rural households and their families providing agritourism services in Montenegro










FAO. 2022. Doing business in the time of COVID-19 – Prevention guidelines and recommendations for rural households and their families providing agritourism services. Rome.




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    Evaluation of FAO/USAID Emerging Pandemic Threats Programme – Phase II (EPT-2) 2021
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has been involved in the Emerging Pandemic Threats Programme (EPT-2), funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) since 2014. The programme sets out to minimize the impact of existing global pandemic threats and to detect, respond to and improve the prevention of emerging threats. Implementation of this programme at FAO has been carried out through 20 projects with efforts concentrated in 36 countries in Africa and Asia. It builds upon lessons learned in the first phase of the programme, in which FAO was involved in improving livestock disease surveillance, enhancing capacity of veterinary epidemiologists and laboratories and improving response to the avian influenza. EPT-2 focuses more in-depth on preventative measures to zoonotic novel pathogens thereby reducing the risk of emergence of such diseases. This evaluation aims to trace the contribution of FAO’s interventions to the programme and assess its outcomes at the global, regional, and national levels. EPT-2 has largely achieved its objectives and outputs in terms of technical capacity development and disease strategy, but less so in terms of enabling policy, value chains, and production. In line with FAO’s 2011 One Health Action Plan (FAO, 2011), EPT-2’s technical focus has strengthened traditional partnerships between FAO and technical livestock departments and ministries and built stronger collaborations with health and environment ministries. The next phase of the EPT-2 programme could take advantage of renewed national, regional, and global interest in ensuring that the COVID-19 experience is not repeated. FAO needs to fully utilize its convening power, partnerships, trusted status, and experience of emerging pandemic threats to engage political and business leaders on the need to consolidate and scale up EPT-2-induced gains to improve pandemic preparedness.
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    The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on food and agriculture have been felt all over the world. As the pandemic unfolded, considerable attention began to be paid to the resilience of agricultural supply chains to COVID-19-related shocks, as well as to natural and human-induced shocks more generally. These "Guidelines to increase the resilience of agricultural supply chains" are intended for policymakers and other stakeholders who need a broad grasp of the concepts, issues and possible approaches involved. Efforts to strengthen resilience to risks need to be based on a thorough analysis of the exposure and vulnerability of supply chains to them, and on a cost–benefit assessment of damages versus interventions. In addition, not all decisions can be based on commercial and economic considerations, as political priorities will also play a role. Governments may take the lead in setting policy priorities based on assessments of risk and resilience capacities, but it is actors throughout the supply chain who are directly affected and who need to consider business strategies and interventions to be able to adapt and transform for the future. Governments play an essential role by supporting the efforts of supply chain businesses and by building general resilience through establishing an appropriate policy and institutional environment, and through the investments they make in physical infrastructure, in putting social protection in place, and in facilitating and promoting collaboration and cooperation. Enhancing general resilience against future risks is important as new risks emerge, and the frequency and intensity of known risks grow with climate change and increasing pressure on natural resources.
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    Supporting Intensive Vegetable Production in Selected Urban and Peri Urban Areas to Mitigate the Impact of COVID-19 Crisis - TCP/BHU/3801 2023
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    The COVID 19 pandemic had important consequences on international trade and food supply chains, which were all the more damaging for countries with import driven economies, such as Bhutan Reliable food provision and economic prospects in Bhutan were hindered by the sudden isolated situation in which the country found itself In particular, the quality and quantity of fresh vegetables, fruits and meat imports were in peril, given the long queues of trucks at the border with India In addition, Bhutan’s tourism and hospitality sector, an important part of its economy, was hit hard by the COVID 19 pandemic, which caused rising unemployment rates, especially in cities, where 77 percent of residents work in the services sector To face the agricultural and economic challenges related to the pandemic, the Government requested the support of FAO to enhance intensive urban and peri urban farming practices and provide greater economic and food security for the population The project was set up to develop urban and peri urban agriculture in 65 converted acres of land, developing the agriculture capacity of young people and laid off employees from the tourism and hospitality sector to produce and supply vegetables to urban markets and ensure alternative streams of income.

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