Thumbnail Image

Health, Knowledge and Flavours

Recovering the traditional culinary knowledge of women in Latin America and the Caribbean for food biodiversity management and enhancement











Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    FAO and Traditional Knowledge: The Linkages with Sustainability, Food Security and Climate Change Impacts 2009
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In developed and developing countries all over the world, farmers and indigenous and local communities have traditional knowledge, expertise, skills and practices related to food security and to food and agricultural production and diversity. Since its creation in 1945, FAO has recognized the significant contributions these make to food and agriculture, and the relevance of on-farm/in situ and ex situ conservation of genetic resources for food and agriculture. Over the decades, FAO has included traditional and local knowledge and activities in policies, programmes and projects related to a wide range of issues, including farmers’ rights, poverty alleviation, nutrition and health, and gender equity, among many others. More recently, it has used traditional knowledge to tackle the emerging problems of soaring food prices and climate change.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Indigenous peoples, Afro-descendants and climate change in Latin America – Ten scalable experiences of intercultural collaboration 2021
    Also available in:

    This publication presents ten scalable intercultural collaboration experiences that demonstrate the importance, efficiency and effectiveness of working hand in hand with men, women and youth of indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean in the search for practical solutions developed from the synergy between ancestral knowledge and scientific and technological innovation. Indigenous peoples and Afro-descendants are two of the rural groups with the greatest potential to contribute to climate change mitigation in Latin America. Both groups are highly vulnerable to natural disasters and the effects of climate on agriculture and food, yet their ancestral knowledge and collective territorial practices make them key allies in climate change mitigation. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has proposed to promote collaborative work with indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples, with national and local governments, in favor of social inclusion and the reduction of inequalities that disproportionately affect indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a particular focus on eradicating hunger and promoting rural development, also following the United Nations mandate to "leave no one behind", as indicated by the central and transformative promise of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Quinoa in the Kitchen 2013
    Also available in:

    Slow Food and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have a shared vision of a sustainable world free from hunger and that safeguards biodiversity for future generations. The collaboration between FAO and Slow Food originates from our common goals and our mutual interest to promote the wealth of local gastronomic traditions in defence of food biodiversity and in support of smallholder farmers and producers. Our common goals are reflected today in a number of shared initiatives. This book - published during 2013, the International Year of Quinoa - has the objective of promoting knowledge about quinoa and its use as an important step contributing towards freedom from hunger and malnutrition. Central to the process is gastronomy itself and the idea that this holistic, multidisciplinary science, which encompasses everything from agriculture to history, from economics to anthropology, from botany to culinary art, can be a liberating f orce for the communities most hit by malnutrition. Ancestral traditions and the protection of biodiversity through work in the fields and use in the kitchen, as in the case of quinoa, can contribute to liberating many people in the world from conditions of food insecurity. From this point of view, Latin America, where quinoa originated and grows best, is proving an interesting testing ground. Today, a new generation of high-profile chefs are rediscovering the forgotten food produ cts of local rural communities and bringing them to the attention of world gastronomy critics. Quinoa is just one of the food products leading this new wave, and maybe the most important: a symbol of a renaissance that is building a gastronomic identity for the peoples of Latin America, a way for them to stand up for themselves. All we have to do is support this movement and demonstrate through knowledge of food products and the stories behind them that, in every local area hit by hunger and malnutrition, it is possible to find solutions to some of the key problems they face. The starting points are in each areas’ unique biodiversity and ancient agricultural and gastronomic traditions. Slow Food and FAO are proud to materialize their collaboration with the creation of this book on quinoa. It provides the reader with a deep understanding of this unique and special food, from the crop's ancient origins to its nutritional properties. The book is also enriched with recipes from renowned international chefs who place particular emphasis on the ease of preparing quinoa and the use of local ingredients.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.