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Community-based Monitoring, Control and Surveillance works in Malawi









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    Mountain fisheries in developing countries 2003
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    Mountains of the world cover about one-fifth of the land surface, are home to one-tenth of the world's population, and provide livelihood to some of the poorest communities in the world. Mountain lakes and streams are a source of freshwater for countless riparian human communities, support industries, provide water for irrigation and hydropower electricity production and for fish. Some countries situated in mountain areas are landlocked, with no access to marine fishery resources, hence the fish of lakes, streams, rivers and reservoirs are an important source of animal protein, always in short supply in mountain countries. The Fifty-third General Assembly of the United Nations declared the year 2002 the “International Year of Mountains”. With the present document, that reviews the current status of capture fisheries and aquaculture in mountains of developing countries of Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Pacific, the FAI Fisheries Department contributes to the efforts of the United N ations to promote sustainable mountain development. As fisheries play an important role in providing food and income to people in mountain areas, they must be integrated into the rural development and water resource development initiatives. Several problem areas are common to neighbouring countries in mountain regions and fishery resources, such as migratory fish stocks, may have to be shared. Specific action programmes for mountain countries, with collaborative actions on a regional scale, may become the most cost-effective way to address those common problems and share experiences.
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    Joint Operations in Lake Victoria to reduce IUU fishing 2014
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    Lake Victoria, Africa’s largest lake, is arguably the most important single source of freshwater fish on the African continent, contributing significantly to national and regional economies and the livelihoods of an estimated three million inhabitants of the three countries bordering its shores, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Nile perch was introduced to the lake in the 1950s and increased in biomass to such an extent that it decimated the lake’s endemic fish community and became the most important fish species in the lake, forming the basis of a lucrative commercial fishery. The Lake Victoria Fisheries Organization (LVFO) was formed in 1994 to jointly manage the Lake’s fisheries resources on behalf of the three partner States, but nevertheless Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing have had a continued impact on Nile perch. Its Biomass peaked at around 2.3 million tonnes in 1999 and accounted for 92% of total fish biomass but fell to less than 300,000 tonnes in 2008. Moreover, the average length of Nile perch has declined from 51.7 cm to 26.6 cm, as recorded in 2008, significantly below the required minimum size of 50 cm for export.
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    Management, co-management or no management? Major dilemmas in southern African freshwater fisheries. Part 2: Case studies. 2003
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    This report contains ten case studies which serve as background for a synthesis report published in FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 426/1. They have been conducted in five medium sized lakes in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Five of the case studies focus on biological and environmental effects while the remaining five are concerned with historical and sociological analysis. In different ways all the case studies focus on some of the following three featur es, relevant for the management of freshwater fisheries in the South Africa Development Community (SADC) region: – How has fishing effort developed in these lakes over the last 50 years? Despite a considerable increase in the total fishing effort in the region, the report demonstrates great variation in effort dynamics both in time and place. Most papers distinguish between changes related to the number of people and changes in technology and investment patterns and show that most of the increases in effort have been population-driven. Only in the case of Lake Malombe have changes in effort mainly been investment-driven. – What causes the changes in fishing effort?

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