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Development of Sierra Leone National Irrigation Master Plan - TCP/SIL/3801








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    Support to Sierra Leone for Review of Cattle Settlement Policy, Protection of Livelihood Assets through Livestock Vaccination and Improving Food Security During Covid-19 Pandemic - TCP/SIL/3806 2023
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    Conflicts between farmers and herders are a cause for concern and a security threat in Sierra Leone. The driving force behind these clashes, which often result in destruction of property and loss of life, is competition for available resources, particularly grazing and arable land. In an effort to address these widespread conflicts, the Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security (MAFS) developed and adopted a Cattle Settlement Policy (CSP) in 2013. The CSP was intended to provide the necessary guidance to tackle issues related to conflicts between crop farmers and pastoralists. However, during the implementation process, it became clear that gaps in the policy hindered its effective enforcement. Assistance was therefore needed to review the CSP and adequately address these loopholes in order to gain broad support from all stakeholders. In addition to cattle, small ruminants are an alternative source of income for livestock owners. They require less pasture, reproduce faster and act as a safety net for livestock owners. Small ruminants in Sierra Leone are typical West African dwarf breeds, well adapted to their environment, but not economically profitable compared to breeds in other countries. To improve livestock production and productivity, the project proposed the introduction of improved small ruminant breeds in two pilot districts (Kambia and Koinadugu).
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    Strengthening of the Pest and Pesticide Regulatory System in Sierra Leone - TCP/SIL/3803 2023
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    Although Sierra Leone has made strides in improving crop protection to increase agricultural production and export, the sector still faces significant challenges. Farmers experience significant crop losses of between 50 and 70 percent in fields or during storage and processing due to poor pests and diseases control management, mainly because of inadequate national expertise in phytosanitary and good agricultural practices (GAPs) to combat outbreaks. As a result, agricultural productivity is low and the quality of exported goods is substandard. Moreover, the use of unsafe pesticides, inadequate pesticide inspection, improper monitoring, and misuse of pesticides make agricultural produce hazardous, surpassing the acceptable maximum residue limit standards for agricultural and environmental criteria. These challenges are further compounded by the lack of effective pest and pesticide management policies and regulations, phytosanitary guidelines, and inadequately trained personnel in phytosanitary and crop protection to assist farmers.
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    Book (series)
    Evaluation of FAO’s country programme in Sierra Leone 2012–2019 2021
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    The agriculture sector in Sierra Leone accounts for 60 percent of GDP and 58 percent of total employment. More than 58 percent of the country’s population live in rural areas and 86.1 percent of this population are engaged in smallholder subsistence agricultural production. Ten years of civil conflict and the Ebola epidemic in 2014 negatively affected food security and the country’s overall socio-economic situation. The country is particularly vulnerable to extreme events such as food chain crises and natural hazards which have a direct impact on food security and livelihoods. This evaluation aims to identify lessons learned and provide strategic recommendations on how FAO programmes can be better oriented in Sierra Leone. FAO’s overall contribution to developmental challenges was assessed in the priority areas defined in the CPFs covering 2012–16 and 2017–19. The evaluation comprised an examination of associated outcome areas related to support to smallholder commercialization, natural resources management, and effective response to disasters and increasing social productivity and resilience. The review also evaluated crosscutting issues, including gender equality and women’s empowerment, climate resilience, nutrition, capacity development and youth employment. The evaluation used different methods to collect the views of the beneficiaries and other stakeholders, such as structured focus group discussions, structured key informant interviews, direct observation, and workshops. The fieldwork took place with actors from projects across five districts: Bo, Bombali, Kenema, Kono, and Port Loko. The evaluation found evidence of significant and sustainable results in a range of areas of FAO’s activities, including policy-related work, from adoption of legislation to policy influence, piloting of approaches, and standards and regulatory frameworks. Likewise, results leading to livelihoods improvements, empowerment and adoption of more sustainable organizational practices, technologies and skills were found. Nevertheless, the programme failed to aggregate activities and interventions in a programmatic and coherent portfolio. FAOs capacity to deliver sustainable and consistent results, with strong partnerships and complementary action, was often undermined by lack of, or weak systems and functions. FAO should use the development of the new CPF as a way to re-design its strategic footprint in the country and reach its full potential, despite the limiting factors. To do this, FAO could consider adopting an area-based approach, implementing a programmatic, multi-stakeholder and cross sectoral adaptive approach based on regions/districts.

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