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Community-based tree and forest product enterprises: market analysis and development







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    Book (stand-alone)
    Community-based tree and forest product enterprises
    Market Analysis and Development - Manual
    2011
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    Through its community-based enterprise development (CBED) programme, the Forestry Department of FAO supports the development of capacity to create small-scale tree and forest product enterprises. Such rural enterprises provide local communities with better opportunities to benefit from forest resources, while also creating greater incentives to sustainably manage and protect those resources. The programme seeks to support the development of business capacity through training in the use o f the Market Analysis and Development (MA&D) methodology. MA&D is especially suitable for enterprises based on natural resources products that need to be protected or conserved because it links participatory natural resources management and conservation activities to income generating opportunities. Besides environmental sustainability, the methodology also takes into consideration social, technological, legal and commercial aspects, providing a wide scope for understanding relevant mark et systems and thus avoiding business failure. As the approach encourages planning and development of business strategies it also contributes to local communities’ investment preparedness, making it easier for them to access external capital and investments such as those related to Carbon Finance.
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    Article
    The role of bamboo forest in balancing and sustaining the development of local livelihood and human well-being in rural areas of Vietnam
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The balanced maintenance between forest development, human health, and well-being is the key to sustainable forest landscape management. My research aims to find out the current status of that relationship in Muong Hinh community (North-Central Vietnam) with the focus on lung bamboo forest - the vital natural resource of local communities. Lung bamboo (Bambusa longissima sp.nov) is an endemic species of Vietnam and is considered a strategic species for development in rural areas. However, due to the over-exploitation and unplanned management, the lung bamboo forests have been remarkably degraded and are even at risk of being depleted. Muong Hinh, currently, has 712 ha of lung bamboo forests and the payment from lung bamboo harvesting is the most important income for the local dwellers. However, it does not meet the local needs due to the low price and low added value. Besides, after years of applying wrong harvesting techniques with high harvesting intensity, local people are losing their forest both in terms of the forest area and quality. There is also a lack of knowledge on sustainable bamboo forest management within the community. Based on the current situation, some recommendations are given on essential techniques for sustainably managing and using bamboo forests. Of which, the proper harvesting intensity and the rotation of exploiting areas are the most critical issues. If the local people are going to apply the suggestions, they probably earn about 440 US$/ha/year from their lung bamboo forest (three times higher than their current income), and it could be increased up to 1,200 US$/ha/year shortly. Moreover, there is also a need to have alternative incomes for stable livelihood development. Several options are developing post-harvesting activities or possessing facilities, setting up a lung bamboo value chain, and reasonable collecting of other potential forest products such as timber or NTFPs. Keywords: forestry, lung bamboo forest, forest landscape management, sustainable livelihood development. ID: 3478867
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    Article
    A transition framework for integration of non-wood forest products into the bioeconomy
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Non-wood forest products (NWFP) are essential to the health and livelihoods of billions of people and are increasingly preferred by consumers worldwide. The plants, fungi, lichens, and animals that provide these products are essential for global biological diversity and are the raw materials for multi-billion-dollar global industries. While overexploitation of these resources often was linked to poverty and food scarcity in lower- income countries, today, unsustainable resource use is also linked to global market demand and even pressure from recreational harvesting in high-income countries. To ensure present and future production, without compromising forest health and resiliency or the people who rely on and benefit from NWFP, these resources should be included at all levels of forest management. The concept of a bioeconomy, which involves using science-based knowledge for sustainable production of food, energy, and other renewable bio-products, provides a framework for ‘green’ growth. NWFP are produced in myriad of systems and realigning these to a bioeconomy framework offers opportunities to refocus and strengthen efforts to achieve a sustainable future with forests that work locally and can be scaled up to achieve global Sustainable Development Goals. We provide contemporary examples of NWFP and the conditions that support their integration into the bioeconomy. From these cases, we identify factors that may stimulate the transition to a bioeconomy with NWFP. Keywords: Forest development, sustainable transformation, economic transitions, nontimber forest products ID: 3480571

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