Thumbnail Image

Social inclusion and utilization of non-timber forest products species variation in ecosystem restoration

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Network and knowledge transmission for climate change on a non-timber forestry product in an era of depopulation, shiitake produced in sawtooth oak trees at Kunisaki GIAHS site
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Climate change is disturbing forests and other ecosystems at a global scale. It could affect how foresters, forest owners, and other related actors manage the forests and conduct their daily lives. This also applies to the producers and strategies of collectors of non-timber forestry products (NTFPs). This study examines, “How climate change affects NTFP producers and strategies of collectors? How resilient are their mitigation and adaption measures for forests and forest communities?” The shiitake, Lentinula edodes, produced in lower temperature are more valuable in market price but are facing challenges. We interviewed veteran producers of shiitake mushroom in Kunisaki City, Oita Prefecture, Japan for the period of June to September 2020. They produce shiitake in the forests of sawtooth oak trees, Quercus acutissima, in a site of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS). In this GIAHS site, the forests retain water and provide water for the irrigation pond system. Shiitake producers underpin this GIAHS system through participating in forest management and food supply. They cut the trees of about 15 years old and utilize the logs for shiitake production inside the forests. The branches of the cut trees are put to cover and humidify the logs until the fungus of shiitake spreads inside the logs. As shiitake production sustains the livelihoods of the producers in the depopulated society, the production maintains the forests for the centuries. The producers are adapting to the heats and frequent typhoons by countermeasures; for example, with the temperature increased, a producer wonders how much they keep producing shiitake which sprouts at low temperature. They also sprinkle more water to cool the inoculated logs. This study explores how traditional knowledge is changing or adapting to climate change and how they are transmitted. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Climate change, Economic Development, Food systems, Knowledge management ID: 3486707
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    NTFPs as a source of livelihood and climate change mitigation & adaptation: a case study from Jharkhand, India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    There is an inextricable link between forest resources and livelihood of rural people .The rural people including tribals – Oraon, Munda, Ho, Savar, Santhal, Birhor, Bhumij etc. living around forest area use these non-timber forest produce (NTFP) as their primary source of income, food, nutrition, and medicine. NTFPs may be used for subsistence or for sale, providing cash income and function as an economic buffer in times of hardships. The paper summarizes activities of livelihood based on NTFPs in Jharkhand .They get employment in activities related to NTFPs like plucking of Tendu leaves (Diospyros sps.), rearing of Silk- (Antheraea mylitta Drury) and cultivation of Lac- (Kerria lacca Kerr), making of fancy items from bamboo and cottage industry based on bamboo. Of these NTFPs, Lac and Silk occupy an important place in rural economy. Lac, which is a natural resin secreted by an insect, Kerria lacca (Kerr.), cultivated on host trees like Palas [Butea monosperma (Lam.) Taub] and Kusum [Schleichera oleosa (Lour.) Oken] .In Jharkhand mostly Tassar Silk is reared which is produced by a wild silkworm of Antheraea mylitta Drury which feeds primarily on host trees like Asan [Terminalia tomentosa (DC) Wt. &Arn].The paper depicts activities of crafts based on bamboo, embroidery on silk cloth and manufacture of decorative items of Lac and other facets of these NTFPs and their contribution in improving earnings of rural people. The paper also critically examines how NTFPs can be effective tool in climate change mitigation and adaptation especially in REDD+. Hence NTFPs are of importance for food security, livelihood option, poverty eradication and for their role in climate change mitigation and adaption. Government policy in India and Jharkhand related to Join Forest Management, enactment of Forest Right Act 2006, and implementing Forest Working plan Code 2014 by, has brought about radical changes in approach towards management of NTFPs. Keywords: Adaptation, Climate Change, Livelihood, NTFP ID: 3486213
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Towards the development of a strategy for sustainable commercialization of non-timber forest products in Kenya: A situational analysis
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) play a significant role in the livelihoods of Kenyans. This paper reports the key strengths that could be optimized, opportunities available, weaknesses that need to be mitigated, and threats that require recognition to have a strategy for the sustainable commercialization of NTFPs in Kenya. This study was funded by The Restoration Initiative (TRI) project being implemented by FAO and other partners. It involved consultations with 50 institutions and a review of relevant publications, reports, policies, legislation, and strategies. The key interventions in the sub-sector include research and development, resource assessment and mapping, value chain analyses, capacity building, value addition, piloting plantation production, and policy reviews for a limited number of products such as gums and resins, honey, aloes, and mushrooms. The major stakeholders are collectors, community groups, traders, National government agencies, County Governments, private sector actors, development partners, and civil society organizations. Key barriers to the commercialization of NTFPs include deforestation, traditional production, and harvesting technologies, inadequate bulking facilities, insufficient value addition, weak market linkages, and information systems as well as weak policy and institutional frameworks. It is concluded that sustainable commercialization of these products in the country requires a strategy that involves revision/domestication of laws and policies, public-private partnerships, research, innovation, value addition, technology development and transfer, capacity building, synergies and complementarities. Keywords: Non-timber forest products, situational analysis, strategy, Kenya ID: 3485349

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.