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Anticipating the impacts of COVID-19 in humanitarian and food crisis contexts











FAO. 2020. Anticipating the impacts of COVID-19 in humanitarian and food crisis contexts. Rome.




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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Information and tools for young agricultural workers during COVID-19 crisis 2020
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    The COVID-19 pandemic is a global crisis which is already affecting the food and agriculture sector. Countries with existing humanitarian crises are particularly exposed to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Support to ensure sustainable agriculture production and maintaining the critical supply chain linkages are extremely important during this crisis and in the context of associated lockdown measures implemented by countries. FAO is playing a key role in assessing and responding to the impacts of COVID-19 pandemic on people’s lives and livelihoods, global food trade, markets, food supply chains and livestock. To mitigate the pandemic’s impacts on food and agriculture, FAO urges countries to meet the immediate food needs of their vulnerable populations, boost their social protection programmes, keep global food trade going, keep the domestic supply chain gears moving, and support smallholder farmers’ ability to increase food production. There are multiple challenges that need immediate attention to safeguard the livelihoods of the smallholders. Some of these challenges include maintaining the linkages with input suppliers, access to markets, provision of knowledge on innovative technologies and practices, and above all maintaining the employment opportunities for rural agricultural workers and youth. Addressing these challenges requires tools, methods and training resources that young agricultural development professionals and rural youth as the critical agents can apply to facilitate the use of innovative solutions and practices by farmers to be able to face these challenges posed. This brief offers a package of tools, training materials and best practices that are immediately available to support youth in responding to the challenges of the pandemic from a food and agriculture point of view.
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    Mozambique | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    Prior to the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) declaration of COVID-19 as a pandemic in March 2020, 1.6 million people in Mozambique were already estimated to be facing acute food insecurity at crisis or worse levels (Integrated Food Security Phase Classification [IPC] Phase 3 and above). The country is directly exposed to the effects of COVID-19 on people’s lives and wellbeing, aggravated by a weak and overburdened health system and high levels of malnutrition. There are also serious indirect impacts on livelihoods, through disruptions to food supply chains and access to food, basic services and humanitarian assistance. In areas that are still recovering from two cyclones and recent drought and floods, any further disruption to food production and value chains could be catastrophic. More specifically, the Southern Region (currently affected by drought), Central Region (affected by Cyclone Idai last year), Cabo Delgado in the north (affected by Cyclone Kenneth, floods, conflict and internal displacement), and low-income urban/peri-urban populations across the country will be disproportionately affected by the pandemic. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.
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    Pakistan | Humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    Pakistan is highly exposed to natural hazards and shocks, including drought. In 2018-2019, severe drought conditions prevailed in 18 districts of Balochistan and eight districts of Sindh, rendering around 5 million people in need of immediate food security and livelihood assistance. Since March 2019, a desert locust outbreak has also affected around 46 districts across four provinces of Pakistan. These issues make a large proportion of the population vulnerable to persistent and chronic food insecurity. The COVID-19 pandemic is further exacerbating poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition, increasing humanitarian needs in disaster prone areas of Pakistan. The average number of daily new cases has been rising sharply since the beginning of June. On 18 June 2020, the Government imposed a “smart lockdown” in several cities to curb the spike in cases. The effects of urgent and essential COVID-19 containment measures are having repercussions on the country’s already fragile employment situation and on livelihoods. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO will implement humanitarian response activities in 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.

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