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Environmental performance of small ruminants supply chains










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    Environmental performance of poultry supply chains 2017
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    Poultry is the most diffused domestic animal species in the world. The global poultry population in 2012 was estimated at just over 28 billion birds, over three times as many as in 1980, with chickens making up approximately 90 percent of the total. The poultry sector is structurally diverse. There are wide differences in the scale, goals and types of system that produce meat and eggs. These may range from smallholder backyard subsistence systems (in developing economies) to backyard systems tha t are small-scale but not subsistence-oriented (in developed countries). The production of poultry products, however, is associated with significant use of natural resources such as land, water and nutrients and contributes to the environmental issues such as GHG, loss of nutrients to water and air and biodiversity loss. These problems may contribute to environmental impacts such as climate change or eutrophication, which threaten ecosystems and human health. Conscious of these challenges, the LEAP Partnership established in 2013 a technical advisory group to develop comprehensive guidelines on the assessment of the environmental performance of poultry supply chains.
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    Environmental performance of pig supply chains 2017
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    Global production of pork has doubled in the last three decades. Demand for pork projected to rise by 32% by 2030, which will put additional pressure on natural resources. This is of particular concern since the livestock sector already has a major impact on natural resources, using about 35% of total cropland and about 20% of green water for feed production. Hence there is growing interest from the pig and other sectors in measuring and improving environmental performance. There are wide diffe rences in the scale, goals and types of system that produce pigs. This diversity means that there is a great variety of production systems with different production intensities and purposes within and among countries. Conscious of these challenges, LEAP Partnership established in 2015 a technical advisory group to develop comprehensive guidelines on the assessment of the environmental performance of pig supply chains.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Nutrient flows and associated environmental impacts in livestock supply chains. Guidelines for assessment
    Version 1
    2018
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    The aim of the methodology developed in these guidelines is to introduce a harmonized international approach assessing nutrient flows and impact assessment for eutrophication and acidification for livestock supply chains taking the specificity of the various production systems involved into consideration. The methodology strives to increase understanding of nutrient use efficiency and associated environmental impacts and to facilitate the improvement of livestock systems’ environmental performance. The guidelines are a product of the Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership, a multi-stakeholder initiative whose goal is to improve the environmental sustainability of livestock sector through better metrics and data. Nutrient use in livestock production systems increased over the last decades due to the increased demand for livestock production. This demand is mainly driven by the increase in the population growth, population income, and urbanization. Consequently, in livestock supply chains, nutrient losses into the environment have contributed to environmental burdens such as climate change, air and water pollution, degradation of soil quality, loss of biodiversity and human health issues. Therefore, there is strong interest in measuring nutrient flows to improve the environmental performance of the livestock sector. The objectives of these guidelines are: • To develop a harmonized, science-based approach resting on a consensus among the sector’s stakeholders; • To recommend a scientific, but at the same time practical, an approach that builds on existing or developing methodologies; • To promote a harmonised approach to assess nutrient flows and impact assessment, relevant for global livestock supply chains; • To identify the principal areas where ambiguity or differing views exist concerning the methodological framework. During the development process, these guidelines were submitted for technical review and public review. The purpose is to strengthen the advice provided and ensure it meets the needs of those seeking to improve nutrient use efficiency and environmental performance through sound assessment practice. This document is not intended to remain static. It will be updated and improved as the sector evolves and more stakeholders become involved in the LEAP, and as new methodological frameworks and data become available. The guidelines developed by the LEAP Partnership gain strength because they represent a multi-actor coordinated cross-sectoral and international effort to harmonize assessment approaches. Ideally, the harmonization leads to greater understanding, transparent application and communication of metrics, and, not least, real and measurable improvement in environmental performance.

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