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Strengthening National Control System in Liberia to Ensure Safety of Foods and Improve Trade - TCP/LIR/3702








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    Foodborne Diseases: Situation of Diarrheal Diseases in Thailand 2004
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    Among food borne diseases, diarrheal diseases in those living in poor environmental sanitation and those with poor personal hygiene have been a major public health problem in Thailand for many years. Major causes of the diseases include contaminated food and drinking water, poor personal hygiene, and poor consumption behaviours. Thailand has implemented a programme for prevention and control of diarrheal diseases in the country, focusing on prevention, investigation, monitoring, reporting, and t reatment of the diarrheal cases. According to the programme, it is reported a decrease in the diarrheal disease incidence in 2003. In addition to diarrheal diseases control programme, the prevention of food borne diseases generated from contamination with other microbiological agents (e.g. worm diseases and hepatitis-A), toxins, and chemical agents (e.g. pesticides and toxic metals) is also a strategy included in the `Food Safety Programme' in Thailand. This programme is emphasized and implemented by the Ministry of Public Health cooperated with other related organizations, aiming at making all foods produced and consumed in Thailand safe and able to meet the international food standard, which could consequently lead the country to become the kitchen of the world.
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    Multicriteria-Based Ranking for Risk Management of Food-Borne Parasites. Microbiological Risk Assessment Series (MRA) 23 2014
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    Infectious diseases caused by food-borne parasites have not received the same level of attention as other food-borne biological and chemical hazards. Nevertheless, they cause a high burden of disease in humans, may have prolonged, severe, and sometimes fatal outcomes, and result in considerable hardship in terms of food safety, security, quality of life, and negative impacts on livelihoods. The transmission routes for food-borne parasites are diverse. They can be transmitted by ingesting fresh o r processed foods that have been contaminated via the environment, by animals or people. Additionally, notification to public health authorities is not compulsory for most parasitic diseases, so official reports do not capture the true prevalence or incidence of the diseases, as much underreporting occurs. This report presents the results of a global ranking of food-borne parasites from a food safety perspective. It also provides an overview of the current status of knowledge of the ranked paras ites in food and their public health and trade impact, and provides advice and guidance on the parasite-commodity combinations of particular concern, the issues that need to be addressed by risk managers, and the risk management options available to them. It documents the ranking process used to facilitate its adoption at regional, national, or local levels. This volume and others in this Microbiological Risk Assessment Series contain information that is useful to both risk assessors and risk ma nagers, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, governments and regulatory agencies, food producers and processers and other institutions or individuals with an interest in foodborne parasites and their impact on food safety, public health and livelihoods.
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    Integrated approaches to the management of food safety throughout the food chain 2002
    Most countries with systems for recording foodborne disease have reported significant increases in the incidence of diseases caused by pathogenic micro-organisms in food over the past few decades. As many as one person in three in industrialized countries may be affected by foodborne illness each year and the situation in most other countries is probably even worse. Apart from the deaths and human suffering caused by foodborne disease, the economic consequences are enormous, running into billion s of dollars in some countries. In Europe bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, "Mad cow disease") and contamination of food with dioxins led consumers to lose confidence in the safety of foods on the market, with severe economic consequences. In many cases, the origins of food safety problems can be traced back to contamination of animal feed or other factors in the early parts of the food chain, an area which until fairly recently had received scant attention from those responsible for food s afety.

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