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Evaluation of the FAO Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean 2017–2020











Annex 1. Terms of reference

Annex 2. Online survey results

Annex 3. Evolution of the Regional Initiatives

Annex 4. Prioritized matrix of findings and recommendations

Management response

Follow-up report

Video


FAO. 2021. Evaluation of the FAO Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean 2017–2020. Country Programme Evaluation Series, 12/2021. Rome.



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