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FAO regional strategy for collaboration with Indigenous Peoples and people of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean

Revised edition










FAO. 2022. FAO regional strategy for collaboration with Indigenous People of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean – Revised edition. Santiago. FAO.



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    This publication presents ten scalable intercultural collaboration experiences that demonstrate the importance, efficiency and effectiveness of working hand in hand with men, women and youth of indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean in the search for practical solutions developed from the synergy between ancestral knowledge and scientific and technological innovation. Indigenous peoples and Afro-descendants are two of the rural groups with the greatest potential to contribute to climate change mitigation in Latin America. Both groups are highly vulnerable to natural disasters and the effects of climate on agriculture and food, yet their ancestral knowledge and collective territorial practices make them key allies in climate change mitigation. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has proposed to promote collaborative work with indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples, with national and local governments, in favor of social inclusion and the reduction of inequalities that disproportionately affect indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a particular focus on eradicating hunger and promoting rural development, also following the United Nations mandate to "leave no one behind", as indicated by the central and transformative promise of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs.
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    This fact sheet describes the course that focuses on how to practically operationalize the indigenous peoples’ right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) throughout all stages of the project cycle. The course describes each of the recommended six steps of the process and the related actions to be undertaken.
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    Indigenous peoples1 must be considered an undeniable stakeholder in a development agenda shaped by such a mandate. Recent estimates indicate that although indigenous peoples make up approximately 5 percent of the world’s total population, they comprise about 15 percent of the global poor.2 The adversities faced by indigenous peoples have grown in the last few decades, but so too have the recognition of and appreciation for their potential contributions to sustainable development and natural resources management. Protecting the livelihood systems and specialized knowledge that are held within these communities will reverse the steady erosion of indigenous cultures but may also bring novel solutions to the fight against food insecurity and malnutrition, poverty and environmental degradation.

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