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Strengthening National Capacities for Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) in the Livestock Sector - TCP/UKR/3702








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    Project
    Managing Antimicrobial Resistance in Thailand - TCP/THA/3503 2019
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    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing global threat. Although much of it can be attributed to the (mis)use of antimicrobials in humans, the overuse of drugs in food animal production also threatens the effective treatment of human and animal diseases. Only limited data on the use of antimicrobials in food animals in Thailand and the Asia and Pacific region are available. However, indirect evidence indicates the widespread misuse of antimicrobials in animal production in the country and region. Awareness of the threat of AMR development and spread is low among public authorities and professionals involved with animal production, and few countries in the region have systems in place to monitor antimicrobial use (AMU) and AMR, carry out risk assessments and develop evidence-based policies for AMR risk management. The project was aimed at assisting the Government of Thailand to contain the spread of AMR in the country through enhanced and harmonized national capacity for AMU and AMR monitoring and AMR risk management, following international guidelines and standards. Project outputs included the development of education and information materials on AMR, guidelines and capacity development activities to reduce the risk of AMR, and the establishment of sample protocols and laboratory diagnostics.
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    Policy brief
    Foodborne antimicrobial resistance (AMR): an economic concern 2023
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    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is the ability of microorganisms to survive or proliferate in the presence of antimicrobial drugs, posing a significant threat to human and animal health. It increases healthcare and food production costs, and the misuse of antimicrobials exacerbates the problem. Effective stewardship and balancing the trade-offs between financial investments and societal benefits are crucial challenges in addressing AMR. Bacterial resistance to antimicrobials is increasing, with foodborne transmission contributing significantly. Contaminated food accounts for nearly 20% of infections caused by resistant Escherichia coli. The economic burden of foodborne antimicrobial resistance includes productivity losses and premature deaths, estimated at USD 50 billion in 2019. The World Bank projects a decline in global GDP, livestock production, and exports due to AMR by 2050, with potential negative impacts on international trade. In conclusion, AMR represents a genuine societal cost, affecting humans, animals, and plants. Therefore, policies are needed to minimize AMR, strengthen food control systems, support responsible antimicrobial use, and promote data sharing.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Engaging agrifood systems to generate data-for-action in tackling antimicrobial resistance
    Addressing antimicrobial resistance through a One Health approach in Sub-Saharan Africa, and South and South-East Asia
    2023
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    This document provides an overview of the 'Engaging Agrifood Systems to Generate Data-for-Action in Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance' project. Its goal is to create an enabling environment for data generation by raising awareness and generating pilot evidence. Additionally, the project aims to identify priority areas for strengthening AMR-relevant governance and piloting targeted good practices. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a natural phenomenon, but the misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in human health and agrifood industries worsen it. In order to make effective decisions at all levels of the food, agriculture, and environment sectors, it is necessary to have more data on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), antimicrobial use (AMU), and antimicrobial consumption (AMC). The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is working to address the challenges underlying data limitations on AMR, AMU, AMC, and antimicrobial residues. With significant support from the Fleming Fund, the project is expected to contribute significantly to global efforts to tackle the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance.

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