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Zero Hunger Turning Commitment into Action to Achieve SDG 2

3 July 2017 · 13.30-15.00 FAO Headquarters, Plenary Hall










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    Mountain agriculture: Opportunities for harnessing Zero Hunger in Asia 2019
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    Mountain food security and nutrition are core issues that can contribute positively to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals but paradoxically are often ignored in Zero Hunger and poverty reduction-related agenda. Under the overall leadership of José Graziano da Silva, the Former Director-General of FAO, sustainable mountain agriculture development is set as a priority in Asia and the Pacific, to effectively address this issue and assist Member Countries in tackling food insecurity and malnutrition in mountain regions. This comprehensive publication is the first of its kind that focuses on the multidimensional status, challenges, opportunities and solutions of sustainable mountain agriculture development for Zero Hunger in Asia. This publication is building on the ‘International Workshop and Regional Expert Consultation on Mountain Agriculture Development and Food Security and Nutrition Governance’, held by FAO RAP and UIR in November 2018 Beijing, in collaboration with partners from national governments, national agriculture institutes, universities, international organizations and international research institutes. The publication provides analysis with evidence on how mountain agriculture could contribute to satisfying all four dimensions of food security, to transform food systems to be nutrition-sensitive, climate-resilient, economically-viable and locally adaptable. From this food system perspective, the priority should be given to focus on specialty mountain product identification (e.g. Future Smart Food), production, processing, marketing and consumption, which would effectively expose the potential of mountain agriculture to contribute to Zero Hunger and poverty reduction. In addition, eight Asian country case studies not only identify context-specific challenges within biophysical-technical, policy, socio-economic and institutional dimensions,
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    Achieving Zero Hunger: The Critical role of investments in social protection and agriculture 2015

    This paper provides estimates of investment costs, both public and private, required to eliminate chronic dietary energy deficits, or to achieve zero hunger by 2030. This target is consistent with achieving both Sustainable Development Goal 2, to eliminate hunger by 2030, and Sustainable Development Goal 1, to eradicate poverty. The study adopts a reference baseline scenario, reflecting a “business as usual” situation, to estimate the additional investment requirements. In this scenario, arou nd 650 million people will still suffer from hunger in 2030. We then estimate the investment requirements to eliminate hunger by 2030. Hunger is eliminated through a combination of social protection and targeted pro-poor investments. The first component aims to bring the poor immediately to the US$1.25/day poverty line income in Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) terms through social protection for a “Transfer to cover the Poverty Gap” (PGT). The second component requires additional investment to acc elerate pro-poor growth of incomes and employment, particularly in rural areas, where most of the poor live, than in the “business as usual” scenario. Targeted pro-poor, including rural and agricultural, investments are required to raise the earned incomes of the poor. This would, in turn, reduce the need for social protection to cover the PGT. The analysis is complemented by looking at alternative ways to achieve such pro-poor growth.

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    2015 Regional Overview of Food Insecurity Latin America and the Caribbean: The Region has reached the international hunger targets 2015
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    In the last two decades, food and nutritional security have become an integral part of the political agenda of Latin America and the Caribbean, and the eradication of hunger and malnutrition is now a regional development objective. In 1990-92, Latin America and the Caribbean began the challenge of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) with 14.7% of its population affected by hunger. By 2014-16 this prevalence has fallen to 5.5% and the region has achieved the MDG hunger goal. The region also m et the goal of the World Food Summit (WFS) established in 1996, having reduced the total number of people suffering hunger to 34.3 million. Poverty has also declined from 2002 onwards, from 44% to 28%, although extreme poverty has risen in the last two years.

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